Finding the resultant of 3 Vectors modeling a force table

In summary, the conversation is about creating a resultant for two vectors that are facing opposing directions and cannot be drawn head-to-tail. The person asking the question is curious if it is possible to create a resultant without disregarding the angle defining the direction of the vectors. The other person suggests that vectors can be added if their individual x, y, z-components are known. If this does not help, they do not understand the question.
  • #1
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Hey, sorry for the basic question, but I'm curious.

Can one create a resultant for 2 vectors that cannot be drawn head- to - tail, and are facing opposing directions?

The idea is that I set up a force table and took measurements on how many Newtons of force are acting upon each spring involving the force table, and represented it with 3 vectors.

Is it even possible to create a resultant for 2 of these vectors at a time, without totally disregarding their angle defining their direction?

All help is appreciated.
 
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  • #2
You can always add vectors - if you know their individual x,y,z-components, for example, simply add them.

If that does not help, I do not understand your question.
 

1. What is a force table?

A force table is a tool used in physics to demonstrate vector addition and the concept of equilibrium. It consists of a circular table with a central point and a set of pulleys on the edge. Strings and weights can be attached to the pulleys to represent different forces.

2. How do you set up a force table?

To set up a force table, first place the table on a level surface. Then, attach three strings to the pulleys on the edge of the table. Next, attach three weights to the strings and adjust their positions so that they form a triangle on the table. Finally, attach a weight hanger to the central point on the table and adjust its position until the table is level.

3. What is the resultant of 3 vectors on a force table?

The resultant of 3 vectors on a force table is the vector that represents the sum of the three individual vectors. It is the net force acting on the central point of the force table and can be determined by measuring the magnitude and direction of the weight hanger.

4. How do you find the resultant of 3 vectors on a force table?

To find the resultant of 3 vectors on a force table, measure the magnitude and direction of the weight hanger using a protractor and ruler. Then, use the laws of vector addition to add the three individual vectors together, taking into account their respective magnitudes and directions. The resulting vector is the resultant.

5. What is the importance of finding the resultant of 3 vectors on a force table?

Finding the resultant of 3 vectors on a force table is important because it allows us to understand and apply the principles of vector addition, which is a fundamental concept in physics. It also helps us to visualize and understand the concept of equilibrium and how multiple forces can act on an object to produce a net result. This is essential in many fields of science and engineering, such as mechanics, electricity, and magnetism.

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