Force of Friction: Car Skids on Ice/Snow

In summary, the force of friction between a car and an icy road while skidding will be equal to the normal force of the road times the coefficient of kinetic friction. This is because the car is in motion and the deceleration due to braking is gone, making it take longer to stop. The equation for this is Fk=μkn. However, there is some confusion about whether the coefficient of kinetic friction while skidding is the same as when not skidding, as it could be either depending on the context.
  • #1
jer_hall99
9
0

Homework Statement




13. As a car skids with its wheels locked trying to stop on a road covered with ice and snow, the force of friction between the icy road and the tires will usually be: (Please note that “normal” and “perpendicular” have the same meaning)

A. greater than the normal force of the road times the coefficient of static friction
B. equal to the normal force of the road times the coefficient of static friction
C. less than the normal force of the road times the coefficient of kinetic friction
D. greater than the normal force of the road times the coefficient of kinetic friction
E. equal to the normal force of the road times the coefficient of kinetic friction.


Homework Equations



Fk=μkn

The Attempt at a Solution


I know that it is kinetic friction since the car is moving. I think that the answer is "C" because the force of friction would be less since the car is skidding. Not sure though, could somebody either confirm my answer or clear up my confusion please?
 
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  • #2
Is this a trick question?

You have the equation right in front of you:

FR = μKN

Is this not your answer? Or am I reading the question wrong?
 
  • #3
It's really not a quick question... I am really just unsure of myself... I take that from your comment you are trying to tell me that the answer then is "E"? Please confirm if the answer is E then. Thank you.
 
  • #4
I don't like this question. Do they mean the coefficient of kinetic friction while skidding or not? It could be either or depending on the context.
 
  • #5
Not sure. I am guessing it would be "E" since the more I think about it, I put "C" on the test and got it wrong.
 
  • #6
Harsh. They could've given you more information.
 
  • #7
Ahh yes it is E if you think about it, the frictional force is the same as if it wasn't skidding, however the decceleration due to braking is gone because the tyres are skidding, therefore it takes longer to stop.
 
  • #8
Thank you.
 

Related to Force of Friction: Car Skids on Ice/Snow

What causes a car to skid on ice/snow?

The main cause of a car skidding on ice or snow is the force of friction between the tires and the slippery surface. When the tires encounter a low friction surface like ice or snow, they are unable to maintain a grip on the road, causing the car to skid.

How does the force of friction affect a car's ability to stop on ice/snow?

The force of friction plays a crucial role in a car's ability to stop on ice or snow. When the road is slippery, there is less friction between the tires and the road, making it harder for the car to come to a complete stop. This is why it is important to drive slowly and carefully on icy or snowy roads.

What factors can increase the force of friction on ice/snow?

The force of friction on ice or snow can be increased by using winter tires with deeper treads, which provide better grip on slippery surfaces. Additionally, driving at a slower speed and avoiding sudden movements can also help increase the force of friction and prevent skidding on ice or snow.

How does the weight of a car impact its force of friction on ice/snow?

The weight of a car can have a significant impact on the force of friction on ice or snow. A heavier car will have more weight pressing down on the tires, which can increase the force of friction and help improve traction on slippery surfaces. However, it is important to note that even a heavy car can still skid on ice or snow if driven recklessly.

Can the force of friction be completely eliminated on ice/snow?

No, the force of friction cannot be completely eliminated on ice or snow. However, it can be significantly reduced, making it more difficult for a car to maintain control on these surfaces. This is why it is important to always drive carefully and take precautions when driving on icy or snowy roads.

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