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Forget ocean levels rising due to global warming what if

  1. Aug 29, 2010 #1

    DaveC426913

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    ...Earth stopped rotating?

    Most of North America would be swamped under poleward rushing oceans.

    A whimsical but cool look at an Earth stopped in its tracks...

    map.jpg

    From http://bigthink.com/ideas/21768".
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 29, 2010 #2

    Pengwuino

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    Thank god for angular momentum.
     
  4. Aug 30, 2010 #3
    Thanks, Dave, for the link.
     
  5. Aug 30, 2010 #4
    D'uh, what about the tide ??
     
  6. Aug 30, 2010 #5

    DaveC426913

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    What about it? Thoughts?
     
  7. Aug 31, 2010 #6
    Do we stop too, or do I need to get carbon fiber underwear for the 1600 KPH skid?
     
  8. Aug 31, 2010 #7

    DaveC426913

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    Heh. Well we can pretend that Earth come to a gentle stop. The oceans still rush poleward.
     
  9. Sep 6, 2010 #8
    As usual for programs like this, it was long on doom and gloom, and short on science.

    The whole atmospheric model is ridiculous.

    While some atmosphere might initially be drawn from the equatorial regions, the resulting heating would draw it back into the familiar convection loop.

    Likewise, the idea of a dry desert mid-band completely ignores what happens when moisture laden winds from the poles crosses the land and drops its load.

    While the Coriolis Effect gives us west to east winds in the Northern hemisphere, it is not the primary driver of our climate or H2O distribution, convection is, and this convection would not only continue, but intensify bringing monsoon like conditions to some areas.

    I suppose when we have an ignorant populace, it is easy to produce rubbish like this, much like the ridiculous idea that a slight increase in a trace atmospheric gas like CO2 would actually have a significant impact on our climate.
     
  10. Sep 6, 2010 #9

    DaveC426913

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    What program?

    What rubbish?
     
  11. Sep 6, 2010 #10
    Sorry, I was referring the the "Aftermath" program, "When the Earth Stops Spinning".
    That's where I originally saw this map, and it all came flooding back, like a bad dream.
    Watch it here:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  12. Sep 6, 2010 #11

    DaveC426913

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    Haha no I don't need to; I'd probably want to take a shower afterwards.

    No, this map is not meant to promote any science; it is just from a "Strange Maps" site. I had no idea the map itself might have any kind of sordid history...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  13. Sep 8, 2010 #12

    mheslep

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    Well slow stop or not, the rotational kinetic energy has go somewhere:

    [tex]\frac{1}{2} I \omega^2 [/tex] = 2.14×10^20 GJ

    Or enough to flash to steam ~5x10^23 kg of cold water. The ocean mass is 1.39x10^ 21 kg. Time to redraw that map all brown, or red because the crust is going to melt too.
     
  14. Sep 8, 2010 #13
    hmmm, any planet around that has no spin but a lot of heat?
     
  15. Sep 8, 2010 #14

    Borek

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    No spin and a lot of heat... to some extent Venus fits. It rotates, but very slowly, and surface temperatures are high enough to melt lead.
     
  16. Sep 8, 2010 #15
    Now, isn't that interesting? :tongue:
     
  17. Sep 8, 2010 #16
    Actually, Venus rotates in reverse, and is the only planet in the solar system that does so. This is an indication of some cataclysmic event, like a large bolide strike, which would explain the conditions observed.
     
  18. Sep 8, 2010 #17
    But still the 'rotational kinetic energy' has to go somewhere or?

    For alternate ideas how you can stop a planet spinning, see Correia et al 2002 and part II (but they did not do the math on conversion of spinning energy).
     
  19. Sep 8, 2010 #18

    Borek

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    I have learned long ago to not even pretend I understand women.
     
  20. Sep 9, 2010 #19
    What if they used a tractor beam?
     
  21. Sep 21, 2010 #20
    I think Baxter had a story once where humans discovered massive superconducting cables wrapped around Venus which had been used to exchange the spin of the planet to a moon it used to have which would have been flung out of the solar system, at the cost of ruining the planet.
     
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