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I Fracture and material strength

  1. Aug 25, 2016 #1
    Let's assume I have a large block of crystalline diamond, with reported compressive strength of 110 GPa. If the cross-sectional area of the block is 1 m2, then obviously if I apply a force of 110x10^9 N the material will begin to fracture. But what if the pressure of 110 GPa is applied locally over a tiny area of say 1 mm2, will the diamond block fracture locally or do other strength criteria apply in this case? My intuition tells me that a pressure applied locally will have a much harder time fracturing the whole block of material than a uniform pressure of the same magnitude applied across the whole cross-sectional area....

    Thanks,

    Gabriele
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 26, 2016 #2

    Nidum

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    Multiple possibilities . Depends on how load is applied and on the material properties , geometry and support arrangements for the block .

    Have you a specific problem in mind ?
     
  4. Aug 26, 2016 #3
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