Frictionless Slide (mastering Physics)

In summary, the child slides down a frictionless 3.1 -long playground slide tilted upward at an angle of 37. At the end of the slide, there is an additional section that curves so that the child is launched off the end of the slide horizontally. At the bottom of the slide, her speed is determined by her acceleration, which is determined by the angle with respect to gravity. Her velocity is all horizontal when she exits the slide.
  • #1
papa_smurf493
30
0

Homework Statement


A child slides down a frictionless 3.1 -long playground slide tilted upward at an angle of 37. At the end of the slide, there is an additional section that curves so that the child is launched off the end of the slide horizontally.

Part A
How fast is the child moving at the bottom of the slide?

Part B
If the end of the slide is 0.34 above the ground, how far from the end does she land?

Homework Equations



Th=V0sin(37)/9.8



The Attempt at a Solution


I think i have to find the total time the child spends on the slide before i can find her velocity I am just not sure on how to go about doing that.
 
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  • #2
You need to find her velocity at the bottom of the incline.

First you need to determine her acceleration down the slide.

That can be determined by the angle with respect to gravity.

With that acceleration - taken over the distance you can determine the velocity, which when she exits the slide will be all horizontal.

Once you figure the time for her to fall .34 m after exiting, simply multiply her horizontal velocity and you will have where she lands away from the end of the slide. Horizontal velocity * time to fall is her distance.
 
  • #3
That can be determined by the angle with respect to gravity

How do i know when to use sin cos or tan, and what one would i use here?
 
  • #4
papa_smurf493 said:
That can be determined by the angle with respect to gravity

How do i know when to use sin cos or tan, and what one would i use here?

Resolve gravity into components normal to the incline and || along the incline.

When you put in θ in your drawing, the side opposite your angle will be sine and the side adjacent to your θ will be cosine.
 
  • #5
thanks for the speedy reply, i will work on this for a bit now and see what i come up with
 
  • #6
ok for the acceleration i took the cos(37)*9.8 and came up with 7.82, is this even close to what i need to be doing?
 
  • #7
ok obvisouly I am doing something wrong here, does anyone have a list of formulas for projectile motion. I don't seem to have any in the textbook, and mastering physics is just giving me questions, no formulas.
 
  • #9
ya i tried both sin and cos and timesed them by the gravity, and then i divided it by the length and part a was still wrong?
 
  • #10
"Frictionless" cries out for using conservation of energy to determine
the final speed.

mgh = (1/2)mv^2
 
  • #11
davieddy said:
"Frictionless" cries out for using conservation of energy to determine
the final speed.

mgh = (1/2)mv^2

True, but I gather the lesson is kinematics. One of the kinematic equations at the link provided is based on just this very conservation of energy, but I gather that ground has not yet been covered.
 

Related to Frictionless Slide (mastering Physics)

1. What is a frictionless slide?

A frictionless slide is a smooth, flat surface that allows objects to slide without any resistance or friction. It is often used in physics experiments to study the effects of motion and gravity on objects.

2. How does a frictionless slide work?

A frictionless slide works by reducing or eliminating the force of friction between two surfaces. This is usually achieved by using a material that has a very low coefficient of friction, such as Teflon or ice. Without friction, objects can slide smoothly across the surface without any resistance.

3. What are the benefits of using a frictionless slide?

Using a frictionless slide can eliminate variables such as friction and air resistance, allowing for more accurate and precise measurements in scientific experiments. It also allows for smoother and more consistent motion, making it easier to observe and analyze the effects of forces on objects.

4. Are there any real-life examples of frictionless slides?

Yes, there are several real-life examples of frictionless slides. One example is a water slide, where the water reduces the friction between the slide and the person sliding down. Another example is a curling rink, where the ice reduces friction between the curling stone and the ice surface, allowing for smooth sliding motion.

5. How is the concept of a frictionless slide used in everyday life?

The concept of a frictionless slide is used in various everyday life situations, such as in the design of roller coasters and amusement park rides. It is also used in the development of sports equipment, such as skis and skateboards, to reduce friction and improve performance. Additionally, the concept of a frictionless slide is used in the development of transportation systems, such as high-speed trains, to reduce friction and increase efficiency.

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