Full-wave rectification circuit question

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In summary, the conversation discusses the warning against measuring input and output voltages simultaneously with an oscilloscope in the full-wave bridge rectifier circuit. The warning is given due to the grounding of the oscilloscope leads, which can result in incorrect signals being displayed on the screen. The conversation clarifies that the ground clips of the probes cannot be placed on two points of different voltages in the circuit, and this is due to the voltage drop across the diode. Ultimately, it is understood that this can lead to inaccurate readings on the oscilloscope.
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K29
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Not sure if I'm posting this one in the right place because its not a "problem" per se. For the full-wave bridge rectifier we are warned not to measure the input and output voltages simultaneously with the oscilloscope! For example
http://www.sonoma.edu/users/m/marivani/es231/units/experiment_05_2.pdf"
on page 4 the warning is given.

Why is this? Does the problem arise through the earthing of the oscilloscope leads(my guess)? I can't quite picture what will happen in the circuit if you were to try to do this.
 
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I guess your input and output voltages are Vs and Vo, am I correct?
The ground clips of the two probes are interconnected and adjusted to have voltage = 0 simultaneously. So simply put it, you cannot choose 2 points of different voltages to be both ground! Here in the circuit, the two points are the lowest point & the leftmost point. Due to the voltage drop across the diode, voltages of those 2 points are different. You simple cannot put the ground clips to those 2 points, as that will result in wrong signals shown on the oscilloscope's screen.
 
  • #3
Understand now. Thanks!
 

Related to Full-wave rectification circuit question

1. What is a full-wave rectification circuit?

A full-wave rectification circuit is an electronic circuit that converts an alternating current (AC) input into a direct current (DC) output. This is achieved by using diodes to block the negative half of the AC waveform, resulting in a pulsating DC output.

2. How does a full-wave rectification circuit work?

A full-wave rectification circuit typically consists of four diodes arranged in a specific configuration called a bridge rectifier. During the positive half of the AC input waveform, two diodes conduct and allow current to flow in the desired direction, while the other two diodes block the current during the negative half of the waveform. This results in a continuous DC output.

3. What are the advantages of a full-wave rectification circuit?

Compared to a half-wave rectification circuit, a full-wave rectification circuit has a higher average output voltage, resulting in a smoother and more efficient conversion from AC to DC. Additionally, it eliminates the need for a center-tapped transformer, making it a more cost-effective option.

4. What are the applications of a full-wave rectification circuit?

Full-wave rectification circuits are commonly used in power supplies for electronic devices such as computers, TVs, and audio equipment. They are also used in energy conversion systems, such as solar panels, to convert AC power to DC power for storage or use.

5. How can I calculate the output voltage of a full-wave rectification circuit?

The output voltage of a full-wave rectification circuit can be calculated by multiplying the peak voltage of the AC input by 0.637. This is because the output voltage of a full-wave rectifier is approximately equal to the peak voltage of the AC input multiplied by the inverse of the square root of 2.

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