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Gases I could expect to see using an IR receiver

  1. Mar 9, 2015 #1
    Hi I was wondering if someone could tell me what kind of gases I could expect to see using an IR receiver between the wavelengths of 110 and 330 nm. As well as this id love to know what kind of glass could be used in order to not interfere with the actual results.
    Thanks a million
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2015 #2

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    Check your numbers. You've listed blue end of visible, and into UV.
     
  4. Mar 9, 2015 #3
    sorry i meant cm^-1
     
  5. Mar 9, 2015 #4

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    Vibrations of weak bonds, rotations. Fill in the blanks for weakly polyatomic molecules with heteronuclear bonds.
     
  6. Mar 10, 2015 #5
    Would you know anywhere that could be a source of the wavelength of gases in this interval? I've been trying to find what gases could be found here for various weeks, although my more pressing question is what glass type can be used in order for results to not be affected.
    Thanks for all your help
     
  7. Mar 10, 2015 #6

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    You want a "Sadtler" for very far IR, into radar/microwave range?
    There may be such, " http://www.lib.utexas.edu/chem/info/sadtler.html ," but if UT says it's beyond their budget, I'm sure it's beyond mine to even browse for compiled data. Your best bet is going to be Chem./Phys. Abstracts, or Sci. Cit. for specific compounds that interest you.
     
  8. Mar 14, 2015 #7
    Thanks a Million.
    I just learned that when doing infra-red spectrometry there must be an infra-red source and another light source( eg. He Ne laser) but of course both these would need individual detectors, would this be done by placing a beam splitter at the exit of the spectrometer after the light has been "in contact" with the gas source?
    And given that the source is a weak infra-red diode and the infra-red detector is a photo-diode, how can one insure there is sufficient infra-red light reaching the detector once it has passed through the spectrometer/interferometer, source and possibly the beam splitter?
    Thanks
     
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