General Relativity Recorded Lectures

In summary, the conversation discusses issues with playing an .avi file and the need for a specific TSCC codec from TechSmith to properly view the video. The participant also mentions the availability of the lectures in other formats and praises the lecturer's teaching style.
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  • #2
I get a black screen using WMP...
And other players say I miss a codec. Does anyone have an idea what codec this would be?
 
  • #5
Is it audio only? Audio atleast works for me in WMP.

Edit:Its avi so I guess it's video also.
 
  • #6
trv said:
Is it audio only? Audio atleast works for me in WMP.

Edit:Its avi so I guess it's video also.

You have to get the codec robphy posted to get the video. You can watch the notes being written down, there's no camera or something.
 
  • #7
Oh ok. Thanks.
 
  • #8
These were re-uploaded or corrected or some such to be working, at least they are working for me using a mac and Perian through Quicktime (they didn't use to). I love these lectures :) Maloney is pretty good at what he does, and he's pretty funny/goofy. Also! he has a set of lectures of mechanics at the Goldstein level which is amazing. They may or may not get into Hamilton-Jacobi theory but they definitely cover the main stuff up until then.
 

1. What is the concept of general relativity?

General relativity is a theory of gravity proposed by Albert Einstein in 1915. It explains how massive objects distort the fabric of spacetime, causing other objects to move along curved paths. This theory has been proven to accurately describe the behavior of gravity in our universe.

2. How does general relativity differ from Newton's law of universal gravitation?

Unlike Newton's law, which describes gravity as a force between two objects, general relativity describes gravity as the curvature of spacetime caused by the presence of massive objects. It also takes into account the effects of acceleration and gravity on the flow of time.

3. What are some real-world applications of general relativity?

General relativity has been used to make predictions and explain phenomena such as gravitational lensing, black holes, and the expansion of the universe. It also plays a crucial role in modern technologies like GPS and satellite communications.

4. Can general relativity be tested and proven?

Yes, general relativity has been tested and proven through numerous experiments and observations. For example, the bending of starlight near massive objects, such as the sun, has been observed and confirmed to be in line with the predictions of general relativity.

5. Is general relativity compatible with other theories, such as quantum mechanics?

Currently, there is no widely accepted theory that combines general relativity with quantum mechanics, but there are ongoing efforts to reconcile these two theories. Some proposed theories, such as string theory, attempt to provide a unified understanding of the universe by incorporating both general relativity and quantum mechanics.

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