Generating as much suction with as little weight as possible

  • #1
KPJ
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello all, as my final project to attain my bachelors, I have tasked myself with designing some sort of device to collect insects from the canopy of soybean plants that can be suspended under a UAS (quad copter/drone). What I am trying to do is essentially build some sort suction device. The problem I am running into is generating enough suction while not exceeding the weight limit I have been given. The weight requirement is 10 lbs. Does anyone have any thoughts on what might work?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Suction only is not power-efficient or weight-efficient. Add the rotating/vibrating brush to shake the insects off.
 
  • #3
KPJ
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Suction only is not power-efficient or weight-efficient. Add the rotating/vibrating brush to shake the insects off.

The issue with that is, the insects need to be collected by the UAS as well. The purpose is for the acquisition of specimens, not removal.
 
  • #4
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The issue with that is, the insects need to be collected by the UAS as well. The purpose is for the acquisition of specimens, not removal.
You misunderstood. Most of insects react to wind/suction by clinging to leaves or branches, and brushing them before sucking helps to increase acquisition yield. You can have 2 cylindrical, counter-rotating brushes flinging specimens to the suction space between brushes.
 
  • #5
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can be suspended under a UAS (quad copter/drone).
Then that 10lbs should include the power source too I guess. Makes it quite a challenge if you want to do it yourself.

The purpose is for the acquisition of specimens, not removal.
So it is actually sample collection?

Most of insects react to wind/suction by clinging to leaves or branches
And since it is a quad copter, there will be wind anyway. Maybe a device hanging down on a rope? That could also work as a brush.

I would check the portable/cordless vacuum cleaners first... But maybe that's a bit of a cheating o0)
 
  • #6
KPJ
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You misunderstood. Most of insects react to wind/suction by clinging to leaves or branches, and brushing them before sucking helps to increase acquisition yield. You can have 2 cylindrical, counter-rotating brushes flinging specimens to the suction space between brushes.
I understand what you're saying now, however, weight is still a concern, what do you think the odds are of having the brushes physically throw the specimens into a collection container to save as much weight as possible. I feel like adding rotating brushes and a suction element is going to throw me way over my weight requirement. I guess the thing to do is test the concept. thank you very much for the reply, you've inspired another design!
 
  • #7
LURCH
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Then that 10lbs should include the power source too I guess. Makes it quite a challenge if you want to do it yourself.
Perhaps the quad copter could be the power source; it’s already designed to move as much air as possible as rapidly as possible, all in one direction. Unfortunately, it is the wrong direction for our purposes, but ifa way could be found to divert air from above the rotors, that could be used for suction, somehow.

Not a fully formed concept, obviously, but perhaps a start.
 
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  • #8
LURCH
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Come to think of it, if you employ Trurle’s “brush” method, you might not even need a separate source of vacuum. If the brushes are mounted on two counter-rotating barrels like the impellers of a vacuum cleaner, the updraft created at the middle should be enough to move the specimens upward and into the containment vessel. Obviously, you would want something much gentler than a vacuum cleaner; longer, more flexible brushes rotating at much lower speed. Otherwise, you’ll be building a harvesting drone.

BTW; do the specimens need to be alive?
 
  • #9
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Now that it’s been some time since the last response, how is the project thus far
 
  • #10
CWatters
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How about carrying a small CO2 cylinder and sending bursts of gas to knock insects off branches? I'm thinking of the cylinders used to blow up bike tyres that only weigh a few ounces or perhaps a bit larger.
 
  • #11
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I agree with LURCH, the most efficient way will be to use the air movement of the quad-copter to generate the suction, though this may have a negative effect on the lift generated, as the air will be pulled up as well as pushed downwards. Which direction are the bugs being collected from - in front of, above or below the 'copter?
 

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