Global Detection & Tracking any Aircraft Anywhere Anytime spots MH370

In summary: This report by Richard Godfrey uses the Weak Signal Propagation Reporter (WSPR) to track the initial movements of MH370. Godfrey refined the path of flight MH370 by using other tracking methods and found that it crashed in the Indian Ocean near the Broken Ridge. There is still no sign of the plane and it is still unknown what caused it to vanish.
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The "Weak Signal Propagation Reporter" (WSPR) has been used in combination with other tracking methods by Richard Godfrey to refine the initial path of flight MH370 in March 2014. That flight disappeared in the Indian Ocean and two extensive underwater searches were unable to locate it.

WSPR is a computer supported protocol developed by Physicist Joseph Taylor - most noted as a 1993 Nobel Physics award for work with pulsars.
WSPR uses weak (5w), narrow (about 6hz), 2-minute signals to create "trip wires" between the transmitter and any receivers.

Godfrey's report (Global Detection and Tracking of Aircraft as used in the Search for MH370) is posted here.

It is the basis for this AirlineRatings.com report.

"Global Detection & Tracking any Aircraft Anywhere Anytime" (GDTAAA) is software developed by Richard Godfrey. He used it to track early movements of MH370 until it began heading due south. He has not yet tracked it to the end of its flight, but extending the apparent last due-south leg of the flight to the "7th arc" (Inmarsat) would land you at 94E,34S.
 
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February 17, 2021, aircraft debris, possibly from MH370 or a 777, washed up in South Africa bay.
https://www.airlineratings.com/news/new-mh370-debris-washed-south-africa/
New possible Malaysia Airlines MH 370 debris has been found in South Africa earlier this month but there has been no reaction from Malaysian officials.

According to wreck hunter, Blaine Gibson the debris was washed ashore in early February in Jeffreys Bay near Port Elizabeth, South Africa. (34°2′ S, 24°55′ E)

Earlier, debris has been found on Réunion at a beach in Saint-André. 20°57′38″S 55°39′02″E

Parts of the right wing and right stabilizer were found on the coast of Mozambique.
 
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6hz?

That's a *huge* sign wave! I thought the lowest useful RF freq was 8hz? Mind you my radar and fire control days were more than 30 years ago and I haven't been updating.

(I was a member of good standing in the weapons shop of an elite F-14 outfit.)
 
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BigDon said:
6hz?

That's a *huge* sign wave! I thought the lowest useful RF freq was 8hz? Mind you my radar and fire control days were more than 30 years ago and I haven't been updating.

(I was a member of good standing in the weapons shop of an elite F-14 outfit.)
6hz is the approximate bandwidth - not the transmit frequency.
I described it as "narrow".
It is used on bands from 30KHz to 30MHz (LF, MF, and HF).
 
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https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/asia/...und-mh370-in-major-missing-plane-breakthrough

A British aerospace engineer claims to have pinpointed the precise co-ordinates where Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 crashed and dropped to the bottom of the southern Indian Ocean, injecting new hope one of aviation's great mysteries might finally be solved. According to revolutionary aviation tracking technology used by Richard Godfrey, MH370 hit the ocean 1933km west of Perth, at 33.177°S 95.300°E, with the plane falling a depth of 4000 metres to the floor below. “The prime crash location is at the foot of the Broken Ridge in an area with difficult underwater terrain,” Godfrey's report, released today, claimed. “There are mountainous outcrops and cliffs, an underwater volcano and a canyon.”
 
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1. What is "Global Detection & Tracking any Aircraft Anywhere Anytime spots MH370"?

"Global Detection & Tracking any Aircraft Anywhere Anytime spots MH370" is a system that uses advanced technology and satellite data to detect and track any aircraft in real-time, anywhere in the world. It was developed in response to the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in 2014.

2. How does the system work?

The system works by using a combination of satellite data, radar data, and other aircraft tracking technologies to continuously monitor the location and movements of aircraft. It can detect and track an aircraft's position, altitude, speed, and direction of travel, and can also identify any unexpected changes in its flight path.

3. Can the system track any type of aircraft?

Yes, the system is designed to track any type of aircraft, including commercial airliners, private jets, military aircraft, and even drones. As long as the aircraft is equipped with the necessary tracking technology, the system can detect and track it.

4. How accurate is the system?

The system is highly accurate, with the ability to track aircraft within a few meters of their actual location. It can also provide real-time updates on an aircraft's position, allowing for quick and efficient response in case of emergencies or unexpected events.

5. How can the system help prevent future aircraft disappearances?

The system can help prevent future aircraft disappearances by providing real-time tracking and monitoring of aircraft, which can help authorities quickly locate and respond to any unexpected events. It can also provide valuable data for investigations and improve overall air traffic safety and security.

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