Going to grad school after military service? GRE scores and NUPOC.

In summary, the conversation discusses the NUPOC program which recruits undergraduate students in technical fields to join the Navy as nuclear engineers. The application process is similar to applying for grad school or an internship and involves letters of recommendation, transcripts, and a technical interview. After selection, candidates undergo 24 weeks of training at NNPS before serving a minimum of 6 years on active duty. The conversation also touches on the potential challenges of applying to grad school after completing the program, including the 5-year limit for the GRE scores and the possibility of doing NROTC or deferring active duty to pursue graduate studies. It is suggested that having a bachelor's degree may even improve the chances of being accepted into NUPOC.
  • #1
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Hello,

I'm a freshman physics and ME major(which will be switched to nucEng when i transfer to purdue, right now it is strictly for thermodynamics and other courses that overlap between ME and nucEng) looking at joining the navy through a program called NUPOC.

NUPOC is a program that aims to recruit 'high quality' undergraduates from technical fields (physics, chemistry, engineering, etc) to join the navy as nuclear engineers. Students go through an application process very similar to applying to grad school or an internship (letters of recommendation, transcripts, and a technical interview comprised of calculus/physics/ engineering/chemistry questions. Ideally, you would go through this process (and be selected your first time around) after your second semester of sophomore year (at which point you start getting paid 3.5k a month to keep your grades up, so applying as early as possible is an advantage, which is why this is on my mind so early on...).

After selection and graduation, candidates are sent to NNPS (Navy Nuclear Propulsion School, which is a 24 week graduate level training program in reactor theory, physics, mathematics, etc). All in all (training, active duty, everything) there is a six year enlistment minimum to be in this program, largely due to the amount of training required.

This worries me.

Having to commit the next 8 years (2 years completing degree, 6 years duty) of your life to something as a sophomore in college is difficult enough, but simultaneously attempting to figuring out if grad school will be a possibility after getting out is a bit..well, impossible.I have done slight research, and in an easy five minutes uncovered numerous dilemmas (GRE scores, academic recommendations, etc) that could be detrimental to an applicant (of course, completing this rigorous program of graduate level work and having applied experience has obvious advantages; but let's focus on the disadvantages and potential problems).So, what potential problems does applying to grad school 6 years after graduating from college pose? Will this be a wall too high to scale, or can this be managed with solid planning?

Phd students, graduates, professors, admissions counselors (basically anyone with constructive knowledge), please fill me in..what are the chances of this ending in something other than catastrophe?
post script:

regarding the GRE:
it would likely be advantageous to take the test directly after completing nuclear power school, if time allows, or right after/during undergrad coursework. Generally speaking, we can assume that taking this test four years after getting a degree will produce scores less than those that one could get upon completion of a degree program. With this being said, is there ANY way around the 5 year limit (applying as a part time student RIGHT at the 5 year cut off was my first thought)?
 
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  • #2
I think it'd be better for you to do NROTC, if you want to do graduate school. If you have a good GPA then you can apply for a scholarship. It's less money, but your tuition is paid. You can also defer active duty to do graduate school, after you complete NROTC. Another alternative would just be waiting until after you graduate. You can also do NUPOC while you are in graduate school, as long as you are within 3 years of graduation. Having a bachelor's degree might even look better on the NUPOC application, it's a rigorous application process.

As for the GRE, the cutoff is five years. But you might as well take it in undergraduate school, that way if you don't like your score, then you have time to re-take it.
 

Related to Going to grad school after military service? GRE scores and NUPOC.

1. What is NUPOC and how does it relate to grad school after military service?

NUPOC stands for Navy Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate program. It is a program that allows active duty military personnel who have completed their service obligation to pursue a graduate degree in a STEM field with the potential to become a Navy Nuclear Officer. Grad school after military service is often a popular option for NUPOC participants, as it allows them to continue their service in a new capacity while also furthering their education.

2. Is it common for military personnel to pursue grad school after their service?

Yes, it is becoming increasingly common for military personnel to pursue graduate studies after their service. Many universities and programs offer special benefits and accommodations for military veterans, making grad school a feasible and attractive option for them.

3. Are GRE scores required for grad school after military service?

GRE scores are typically required for admission into most graduate programs, including those pursued after military service. However, some programs may have alternative requirements or may waive the GRE requirement for military veterans. It is important to check with individual programs for their specific requirements.

4. How do I prepare for the GRE if I am considering grad school after military service?

There are many resources available for preparing for the GRE, including study guides, practice tests, and online courses. It is important to start studying early and to create a study plan to ensure you are adequately prepared for the test. Additionally, some programs may offer GRE preparation courses specifically for military veterans.

5. Can I use my military experience to fulfill requirements for grad school?

In some cases, military experience may be able to be used to fulfill certain requirements for grad school, such as prerequisites or work experience. However, this varies by program and it is important to check with individual programs for their specific policies on using military experience for credit towards a graduate degree.

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