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Classical Good book for Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics

  1. Sep 14, 2016 #1
    This book should introduce me to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics and slowly teach me how to do problems. I know about Goldstein's Classical Mechanics, but don't know how do I approach the book.
     
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  3. Sep 14, 2016 #2

    Dr Transport

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    Schaum's outline....
     
  4. Sep 14, 2016 #3

    vanhees71

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    What's your level in physics and math? Also note that Goldstein's book contains a serious bug concerning anholonomous constraints!
     
  5. Sep 14, 2016 #4
    Am in my final year of bachelors consisting of Mathematics and Physics. I don't have Lagrange's or Hamiltonian Mechanics in my course. I want to do a self study.
    If there are any prerequisites before I start L & H. Please mention.
     
  6. Sep 14, 2016 #5

    vanhees71

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    Then you should have the prereqesites for analytical mechanics. A good book is

    F. Scheck, Mechanics - From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos, Springer (2010)
     
  7. Sep 14, 2016 #6
    Would you mind adding any prerequisites before i start the book. I'll cross check and learn if I don't know anything.
     
  8. Sep 15, 2016 #7
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  9. Sep 17, 2016 #8
    What about Taylor's Classical Mechanics?
     
  10. Sep 18, 2016 #9
    But it's a Graduate Text and quite advanced for beginners. Any suggestion how do i approach this book so that I can grasp well.
     
  11. Sep 18, 2016 #10

    vanhees71

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    Hm, that's difficult to answer. Usually this book is used in the introductory lecture on classical mechanics of the theory course in Germany. At our university in Frankfurt that's already in the 2nd semester. Perhaps also the corresponding volumes of Greiner's theory-book series is more detailed so that it's easier to get started with. In my own studies the standard text for that purpose was Goldstein. Another very good source is of course Landau-Lifshitz but that's at a higher level than Scheck.
     
  12. Sep 18, 2016 #11
    L&L, although at a high level, is surprisingly lucid and easy to read....
     
  13. Sep 19, 2016 #12

    Student100

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    You're finishing a degree in physics (and math too I suppose), you aren't a beginner anymore. Or at least, you shouldn't be. You're a year removed from graduate school, graduate level texts shouldn't intimidate you.

    What texts did you use for upper division mechanics? Taylor, Marion?
     
  14. Sep 19, 2016 #13
    I agree what you said student100. I didn't have quality education in my high school. Am working myself and building up slowly. In my bachelors i didn't have any introduction to Lagrange's or Hamiltonian mechanics. Trying my best to build day by day. I didn't use any of the books above what you mentioned.
     
  15. Sep 19, 2016 #14

    atyy

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  16. Sep 19, 2016 #15

    Student100

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    Start with Taylor, afterwards you can move onto Goldstein/similar level text.
     
  17. Sep 20, 2016 #16

    rude man

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    Housner & Hudson, Applied Mechanics Dynamics if it's still available.
     
  18. Sep 20, 2016 #17
    Try V.I. Arnold, Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics, or Abraham and Marsden, Foundations of Mechnics.
     
  19. Sep 20, 2016 #18
    Walter Greiner, Classical Mechanics.
     
  20. Sep 20, 2016 #19
    I studied Goldstein as a senior. However, over the next summer i read Landau and Lifshitz and found it much more compelling. I think that if you are planning to go to grad school, you should simply sit down and read Landau and Lifshitz. It is much, much shorter and has all you need for next steps (e.g, Messiah's two-volume set on quantum theory).
     
  21. Sep 20, 2016 #20
    Schaum's series is best. also Melvin G. Calkin book on this topic.
     
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