Grad School in Europe: Find Financial Aid & Research Opportunities

In summary, it is possible for foreign students to receive funding for PhD positions in Europe, but it may be more difficult in the UK. Most physics departments in Europe use English as the primary language of communication and it is possible to go straight into a PhD program in many countries without a Master's degree. However, in Germany, a Master's degree may be expected and there are usually no tuition fees for PhD programs.
  • #1
jweygna1
16
0
I'm an undergrad at an Ivy League school with very good grades and a lot of research experience. I want to go to grad school in Europe: England (Oxford, Cambridge obviously), Italy(I speak Italian), or Scandinavia (or anywhere where english is spoken in the physics world). I know in the US they pay students to do their grad work and was wondering if there was something similar in Europe (for foreign students in my case). I would love to continue my physics education in Europe to pay an arm and a leg to go to Oxford if I could get a stipend to go to Harvard (all hypothetical at this point of course). Thanks!
 
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  • #2
jweygna1 said:
I want to go to grad school in Europe: [...] anywhere where english is spoken in the physics world.
That would be anywhere in Europe, and pretty much anywhere in the world, too.

I know in the US they pay students to do their grad work and was wondering if there was something similar in Europe (for foreign students in my case).
Yes. PhD positions are usually paid; either you're employed at the university, or you apply for a stipend, or you're employed for tutoring. Haven't heard of any case where this wasn't the case (except for people wanting to work in a group without money so badly that they did it for free, but that's far from the norm).

I would love to continue my physics education in Europe to pay an arm and a leg to go to Oxford if I could get a stipend to go to Harvard (all hypothetical at this point of course). Thanks!
I'm not understanding this sentence. You want to go to Oxford (England) if you get admission to Harvard (US)? And why Oxford, anyways? I thought that Oxford is famous for their politics, business, law, history, etc. courses.
 
  • #3
If you go to Europe with a Bachelor's only, you will have to do a Master's degree first. There are no exceptions in the field of Physics to my knowledge. Master's degrees are never paid.

On the PhD level, that is different. However, good luck finding funding in the UK. From what I can tell (heresay from friends and fellow students), getting funding in the UK is really really really hard.
 
  • #4
Stalafin said:
If you go to Europe with a Bachelor's only, you will have to do a Master's degree first. .

This is simply not true. I know a dozen people studying their PhD's in the UK who started after 3-year bachelor's degrees. They now study physics/engineering at Bristol, Birmingham, Liverpool, etc. All you need is a completed degree, 2:1 or better (their bachelors did have a substantial individual project, but it was only worth 25% of their final year marks). There are only one or two exceptions in the UK, like Imperial, and it can vary throughout Europe but it is normal to go straight onto a PhD without MSc/MA.Almost all physics departments work English, as they all need to know it to communicate with the rest of the industry. The only trouble I think you may have is that some stipends are ear-marked for EU-based students.

But, yes, it is absolutely possible for you to study and afford it in Europe.

EDIT: look here:
http://www.findaphd.com/search/phd.aspx?keywords=physics
If there is a globe next to it, funding is for every one. Ring of stars = Europe, Union Jack = UK. This doesn't cover Italy, Germany, etc. but no doubt there are similar sites.
 
  • #5
http://www.phdportal.eu/


Note that for PhD in Germany, one is expected have a master's degree, as most PhD students don't attend any courses.

The way it is in Germany, a PhD student is considered an employee and is paid, hence there is no official 'phd programme' and not many are listed in the website above as it lists only programmes.

Also, there are no tuition fees for the phd in general.
 
  • #6
streeters said:
This is simply not true. I know a dozen people studying their PhD's in the UK who started after 3-year bachelor's degrees. They now study physics/engineering at Bristol, Birmingham, Liverpool, etc. All you need is a completed degree, 2:1 or better (their bachelors did have a substantial individual project, but it was only worth 25% of their final year marks). There are only one or two exceptions in the UK, like Imperial, and it can vary throughout Europe but it is normal to go straight onto a PhD without MSc/MA.


Almost all physics departments work English, as they all need to know it to communicate with the rest of the industry. The only trouble I think you may have is that some stipends are ear-marked for EU-based students.

But, yes, it is absolutely possible for you to study and afford it in Europe.

EDIT: look here:
http://www.findaphd.com/search/phd.aspx?keywords=physics
If there is a globe next to it, funding is for every one. Ring of stars = Europe, Union Jack = UK. This doesn't cover Italy, Germany, etc. but no doubt there are similar sites.

That's right.
At Cambridge, a PhD in the department of physics do not need a master degree. But a PhD in the department of applied math and theoretical physics need to go through part iii math first, with very few exceptions.
 
  • #7
streeters said:
This is simply not true. I know a dozen people studying their PhD's in the UK who started after 3-year bachelor's degrees. They now study physics/engineering at Bristol, Birmingham, Liverpool, etc. All you need is a completed degree, 2:1 or better (their bachelors did have a substantial individual project, but it was only worth 25% of their final year marks). There are only one or two exceptions in the UK, like Imperial, and it can vary throughout Europe but it is normal to go straight onto a PhD without MSc/MA.


Alright, I am sorry; I was under the impression that the same thing applies to the UK as well. Then again, the statement remains true for main Europe. :-)
 

Related to Grad School in Europe: Find Financial Aid & Research Opportunities

1. How do I find financial aid for graduate school in Europe?

There are several options for financial aid for graduate school in Europe. You can apply for scholarships and grants offered by universities, government organizations, and private foundations. You can also look into student loans and work-study programs. Additionally, some countries in Europe offer lower tuition fees for international students.

2. Are there any research opportunities available for graduate students in Europe?

Yes, there are plenty of research opportunities for graduate students in Europe. Many universities have well-funded research programs and offer opportunities for students to work with faculty members on research projects. You can also apply for research grants and fellowships offered by organizations and institutions in Europe.

3. Can I study in English at graduate school in Europe?

Yes, many universities in Europe offer graduate programs in English. However, it is important to check the language requirements of the specific program and university you are interested in. Some programs may require proficiency in the local language as well.

4. How do I choose the right graduate program in Europe?

Choosing the right graduate program in Europe depends on your individual interests, career goals, and academic background. Research the universities and programs thoroughly to find the best fit for you. Consider factors such as program curriculum, faculty, research opportunities, and location.

5. Do I need a visa to study in Europe for graduate school?

Yes, international students typically need a student visa to study in Europe for graduate school. The specific requirements and application process may vary depending on the country you are studying in. It is important to research and plan ahead to ensure you have all the necessary documents and meet the visa requirements.

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