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Graduate Study in Particle Accelerator

  1. Jan 7, 2008 #1
    Hi. I've been searching through graduate program which allows a student to work on subjects that are related to particle accelerator. I've found few well known programs. However, I was hoping some of you can introduce me more of such programs. I've found Stanford, Cornell, and UCLA has research group working on accelerator technology.

    Also, if I want to study the in/out of particle accelerator, what type of courses would you recommend me to take as an undergraduate student?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 7, 2008 #2

    ZapperZ

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    There are several well-respected particle accelerator programs in the country in addition to what you have listed:

    Maryland, Indiana, USC, Berkeley, etc.

    You might want to check out the Particle Accelerator School program, which has for-credit courses given at various times of the year. This includes both graduate and undergraduate courses. I have written about this program here, or you can go to their webpage directly.

    http://uspas.fnal.gov

    In case you are interested, the Illinois Accelerator Institute has started the Lee Teng undergraduate internship program in accelerator physics. You can also go to the internship website directly at

    http://www.illinoisacceleratorinstitute.org/

    I have to admit, it is very unusual to find an undergraduate who is interested in accelerator physics. :)

    Zz.
     
  4. Jan 7, 2008 #3
    Are you kidding? Accelerators are Big Science, and the most exciting of it. Admittedly most of those who are interested in accelerator work in general would be more into the particle physics side, but surely one also has to know a great deal about the machines themselves to do so?
     
  5. Jan 7, 2008 #4

    ZapperZ

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    Actually, no. People who do "accelerator physics" do not do "high energy physics", and high energy physicists are not accelerator physicists. That's a common misconception about the field of accelerator physics. I know, I've done several PR work on this field, especially during our Open House.

    While one of the major application of accelerators is a particle collider/high energy, this is not the only area that accelerators are used. We have medical accelerators, accelerators at synchrotron centers, etc...

    Zz.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2008 #5
    Well, I'm interested in how to make one for medical purpose. ^^;
    My gut tells me there will be more and more accelerator for purposes outside of pure physics research. It seems to me a good carrer field where I can amply learn high tech and physics!

    By the way, thank you very much for the great source!
     
  7. Jan 8, 2008 #6
    Aha, yes. That'll teach me to read the original post thoroughly. I am definitely aware of the difference. However, I would have expected a significant overspill, and it surprises me that accelerator physics is considered unpopular with undergrads.
     
  8. Jan 8, 2008 #7

    ZapperZ

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    Accelerator physics isn't a common undergraduate course. It is also not a common topic in various physics courses that illustrates application of the physics they are trying to convey. Where one might get a hint of it is in classical E&M. Furthermore, many parts of accelerator physics actually are more in the flavor of "electrical engineering" than physics. I think people in the Accelerator Physics community are evenly distributed between physics and electrical engineering. I think the accelerator physics programs at USC, UCLA and Maryland, for example, are in the electrical engineering dept.

    Zz.
     
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