Graph for Domino Drop Experiment

  • Thread starter 1NS4N3 4ZN
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Drop Graph
In summary, the conversation discusses an experiment on the relationship between the time it takes for dominos to drop and the distance between each domino. The individual is unsure of how their graph should look and asks for advice. They suggest starting the experiment with a displacement of 2 centimeters between each domino and not putting a point on the y-axis since there cannot be 0 distance between dominos. It is suggested to plot time taken vs the number of dominos fallen, resulting in a cumulative distribution function type graph.
  • #1
1NS4N3 4ZN
2
0

Homework Statement


I'm doing an experiment on the relationship between the time it takes for a line of dominos to drop and the constant distance between each domino. I plan to try different distances to get different times, but I don't know what my graph should look like, nor do I know if a point should be placed on the y-axis, since you can't really have 0 distance between the dominos and expect accurate results. If someone could give me some pointers on what a graph should look like in this instance, that'd be great.


Homework Equations


Not sure if I need any.


The Attempt at a Solution


Judging by the fact that you can't really expect the dominos to drop if there's no distance between them (as it'd be one packed line) I assume that I just shouldn't put a point on the y-axis and should, instead, start my experiement with 2 centimeters displacement between each domino or so. When I make my graph, I'd have a line segment beginning at that point instead of having it start when x=0.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Well if you plot the time taken vs the number of dominos fallen, then I think you'll essentially be plotting a sort of cumulative distribution function type graph.
 

1. What is the purpose of creating a graph for the Domino Drop Experiment?

The purpose of creating a graph for the Domino Drop Experiment is to visually represent the data collected during the experiment in a clear and organized manner. It allows for a better understanding of the relationship between the independent variable (number of dominoes) and the dependent variable (time it takes for the dominoes to fall).

2. How do you choose the appropriate type of graph for the Domino Drop Experiment?

The appropriate type of graph for the Domino Drop Experiment would be a line graph, as it shows the relationship between two continuous variables (number of dominoes and time). A bar graph or pie chart would not be suitable as they are used to display discrete or categorical data.

3. What is the importance of labeling the axes on the graph for the Domino Drop Experiment?

Labeling the axes on the graph for the Domino Drop Experiment is important because it provides context and understanding of the data being presented. The x-axis should represent the independent variable (number of dominoes) and the y-axis should represent the dependent variable (time). This allows for easy interpretation of the results.

4. How do you determine the scale for the axes on the graph for the Domino Drop Experiment?

The scale for the axes on the graph for the Domino Drop Experiment should be chosen based on the range of the data collected. The scale should be evenly spaced and allow for all data points to be plotted without overcrowding. It is also important to include units of measurement for each axis.

5. Can a graph for the Domino Drop Experiment be used to make predictions or draw conclusions?

Yes, a graph for the Domino Drop Experiment can be used to make predictions and draw conclusions. By analyzing the trend of the data on the graph, one can make predictions about the time it would take for a certain number of dominoes to fall. Additionally, the graph can be used to draw conclusions about the relationship between the variables and to support or reject the hypothesis of the experiment.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
689
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
259
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
12
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
974
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
947
Back
Top