Gravity Wave - Wavelength / Freq

  • Thread starter lowing99
  • Start date
  • #1
37
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hi Folks

Does anyone know if Gravity waves have been measured accurately enough to have a wavelength and frequency at the quantum scale.

I'm looking for any data measured in Plancks.

Bit of a random one, it relates to some research I am doing at the moment.

Thanks

Best

Colin
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ZapperZ
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
35,451
4,215
Not only have gravitational waves NOT been measured "accurately enough", it also has NOT been detected YET!

You need to go to LISA and LIGO webpages, for example, and gather your information. Shouldn't you need that to include in your "research"?

Zz.
 
  • #3
37
0
Thanks for the quick answer Zapper,

I figured as much, they will be detected I'm sure.

I'm expecting a wavelength of 4 - 16 P. I'm just hoping for the confirmation. If it is discovered (hopefully soon) and it is within this range, I'm going to be a very excited bunny :)

Best

Colin
 
  • #4
318
0
The decteced wavelength will strongly depend on the source emitting the gravitational wave. One of the most likely signals to be detected should origin from binary black hole inspiralling onto each other. The signal should have a characteristic "chirp" form towards the end with strongly increasing frequency (decr. wavelength). A likely range should be 295 to 2000Hz for 20 Solar mass black holes. That would correspond to wavelengths of roughly 1000km.
What unit is P supposed to be?
The frequency range on LIGO is 2 to ca. 4000 Hz, so the smallest detectable waves will have wavelengths of 500km.
 
  • #5
ZapperZ
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
35,451
4,215
I'm guessing that "P" might be what the OP called "Plancks". If this is the Planck length scale, boy is he/she seriously off track!

Zz.
 
  • #6
37
0
Thanks Betel for the information.

Best

Colin
 
  • #7
5,601
39
  • #8
318
0
Welcome lowing. It would be nice if you in return answered my question about P.
 
  • #9
37
0
Yes it was planck lengths, I'm way out it seems :)

I was simply wondering if anybody had theorised or suggested very small gravity waves with a wavelength at a scale smaller than primary particles, it was just a spin off idea from something else I was doing. The references Naty posted (thanks btw) looked interesting, so i'll check that out. I'm going to check out the LISA and LIGO webpages as suggested.

Best

Colin
 

Related Threads for: Gravity Wave - Wavelength / Freq

  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
5K
Replies
8
Views
6K
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
23K
Replies
11
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
Top