Guass's law nonconducting plates

In summary, the problem involves two nonconducting plastic sheets with different charge densities on their surfaces. Using Gauss's law, the magnitude and direction of the electric field at three different points on the sheets (A, B, and C) must be found by adding up the contributions from each sheet's charge density. The electric field at point A is 5.00 cm from the left face of the left-hand sheet, the electric field at point B is 1.25 cm from the inner surface of the right-hand sheet, and the electric field at point C is in the middle of the right-hand sheet. The electric field can be calculated using the equation E = (1/4*pi*epsilonnaut)(sigma/2),
  • #1
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Homework Statement


Two very large, nonconducting plastic sheets, each 10.0 cm thick, carry uniform charge densities \sigma_{1}, \sigma_{2}, \sigma_{3}, and \sigma_{4} on their surfaces, as shown in the figure . These surface charge densities have the values sigma_{1}= -6.00microC/m^{2}, \sigma_{2}= +5.00 micro C}/m}^{2}, sigma_{3}= +2.00 micro C}/m}^{2}, and \sigma_{4}= +4.00 micro C}/m}^{2}.

1.Use Gauss's law to find the magnitude of the electric field at the point A, 5.00 cm from the left face of the left-hand sheet.

2.Find the direction of the electric field at the point A.

3.Find the magnitude of the electric field at the point B, 1.25 cm} from the inner surface of the right-hand sheet.

4.Find the direction of the electric field at the point B.

5.Find the magnitude of the electric field at the point C, in the middle of the right-hand sheet.

6.Find the direction of the electric field at the point C.

Homework Equations


E=(1/4*pi*epsilonnaut)(q/R^2)


The Attempt at a Solution


I'm not really sure how to set this problem up. I'm not sure if all the charges act on each point
 

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  • #2
jimbo71 said:

Homework Equations


E=(1/4*pi*epsilonnaut)(q/R^2)
That's the field from a point charge--you won't need that for this problem.

The Attempt at a Solution


I'm not really sure how to set this problem up. I'm not sure if all the charges act on each point
Use Gauss's law to find the field from a sheet of charge. Then add up all the fields at each point in question.
 
  • #3
I know we have to use E=sigma/2epsilon, but I'm not sure which fields (1 and/or 2 and/or 3 and/or 4) to add together for point A for example.
 
  • #4
They all count--add them all. (Be careful with their direction and sign.)
 

What is Gauss's law for nonconducting plates?

Gauss's law for nonconducting plates states that the electric flux through a closed surface is equal to the charge enclosed by that surface divided by the permittivity of free space.

What is the significance of nonconducting plates in Gauss's law?

Nonconducting plates, also known as dielectric plates, have a permittivity greater than that of free space. This means that they can store more electric charge and have a greater influence on the electric flux through a closed surface.

Can Gauss's law be applied to nonconducting plates in all situations?

No, Gauss's law for nonconducting plates is only applicable in situations where the electric field is uniform and perpendicular to the surface of the plate.

How do nonconducting plates affect the electric field within a capacitor?

Nonconducting plates, when placed between the plates of a capacitor, increase the capacitance by reducing the electric field between the plates. This allows for the storage of more charge and increases the overall energy stored in the capacitor.

Are there any real-life applications of Gauss's law for nonconducting plates?

Yes, Gauss's law for nonconducting plates is used in the design and analysis of capacitors, which are widely used in electronic devices such as computers and smartphones. It is also important in understanding the behavior of dielectric materials in electrical insulation.

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