Half my house is freezing the other half is hot

  • Thread starter DaveC426913
  • Start date
In summary, according to the summarizer, the following is happening:-The new wall has blocked the free return of the supplied air back to the air handler unit, causing it to be too warm on the top floor;-There is a problem with the thermostat, but it's not the root of the problem;-There may be a need for a transfer duct to solve the interference, or for duct automatic dampers to be installed.
  • #36
russ_watters said:
What do people do in the UK for domestic hot water?
A single boiler for CH and water. There are options of a hot water tank or a combi boiler. Only one expensive item and two plumbing circuits. But AC has not been commonly used in UK. A proper Energy policy with home insulation would see things that way, even with climate change.
russ_watters said:
I don't understand what you mean.
Dry = Hot air. Wet = radiators. Two different approaches which seem to be mutually foreign to UK and US. An analogue to the clash of cultures about electricity supply. As usual there are good reasons for either but we all make assumptions about what the other guy does..
DaveC426913 said:
Is it that there isn't enough land, or is it - like here in Canada - that the only land people want is in cities?
Because, for a tiny nation, UK seems remarkably rife with green space.
There, in Canada, you have land, lots of land. Green belt has been jealously guarded and Nimbyism rules in UK. Urban living is popular but folks can't afford their mortgages. It was pointed out, today, that mortgages in the US are usually for long terms at a fixed interest rate. These days, in UK, interest is seldom fixed for more than a very few years. That's another difference between east and west.
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #37
sophiecentaur said:
Dry = Hot air. Wet = radiators. Two different approaches....
Fair enough....we call it "central air" here and it confused me to call it "dry' due to all the water pouring down the drain...
...which seem to be mutually foreign to UK and US. An analogue to the clash of cultures about electricity supply. As usual there are good reasons for either but we all make assumptions about what the other guy does.
Yeah, it's the different requirements/constraints that make most of the difference. The design choices do make sense in context.

But I just realized....
I'm working on an all-electric/zero carbon lab project, and we had a very hard time finding air source hot water boilers. Our major equipment vendor had never sold one in the US and had to lean on their European division for assistance. Even still, product options are very thin and there are many available in Europe/Asia that are not available in North America. And I just realized why: When Northern Europe electrifies, they will easily convert from natural gas and oil boilers to heat pump boilers whereas in the US all our residential and light commercial heat pumps are forced air. We simply don't have anywhere near the market for a heat pump boiler as exists in Europe. Also, ginormous natural gas reserves, so less geopolitical pressure.
 
  • Like
Likes sophiecentaur
  • #38
Can't you just put in a small window AC unit upstairs? Then you can use less central AC on the main floor.
 
  • Informative
Likes Tom.G
  • #39
bob012345 said:
Can't you just put in a small window AC unit upstairs? Then you can use less central AC on the main floor.
Why not just use a fan and some ducting to get warmer air into the cooler rooms? A/C involves yet more electrical power input and, of course, it's expensive to buy.
 
  • Like
Likes russ_watters
  • #40
sophiecentaur said:
Why not just use a fan and some ducting to get warmer air into the cooler rooms? A/C involves yet more electrical power input and, of course, it's expensive to buy.
Ceiling fans can mix up the air. There are two settings, one for summer and one for winter. The upper fans could be used to push the hot air down and the lower fans to pull the cool air up.
 
Last edited:
  • #41
bob012345 said:
Ceiling fans can mix up the air.
I wasn't proposing a ceiling fan. I was thinking in terms of a large diameter, slow, 'extractor fan'. The big ones shift a lot of air (good for smokey kitchens) and are bidirectional. Trunking etc. is always available to fit the popular ones. You could annoy your house sharers by pumping curry / steak aroma into their half.

The logic of the ceiling fan (Punka) is to blow air downwards in summer and upwards in winter - or is it the other way? :wink:
 
  • Like
Likes russ_watters
  • #42
To return to the original question in the OP, I think that the comments about the return vent are spot on. Might be worth patching in another return duct on the side without one, or to put a vent between sections to allow crossflow.

Another possibility, though much more complicated, would be some sort of proportioning valves in the ducts to force air at different rates to different areas. The issue I see with that beside the complexity is the controls. You'd basically have to reverse the proportions as the seasons change, i.e. more flow downstairs in the winter for heating, more flow upstairs in the summer for cooling.
 
  • #43
Flyboy said:
To return to the original question in the OP, I think that the comments about the return vent are spot on. Might be worth patching in another return duct on the side without one, or to put a vent between sections to allow crossflow.
You recently retired?
 
  • Love
Likes Tom.G

Similar threads

  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • General Discussion
Replies
8
Views
931
Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
14
Views
3K
  • Electrical Engineering
3
Replies
83
Views
4K
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
18
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
626
Replies
15
Views
6K
  • Precalculus Mathematics Homework Help
Replies
31
Views
3K
Back
Top