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Heat and temperature Please See THIS

  1. Jan 11, 2006 #1
    Hi I am a student at Brazil and I have a question.

    Is possible this phenomenon: A tube passes steam from a container of boiling water into a saturated aqueous salt solution. Can it be heated by the steam to a temperature greater than 100°C ?
     
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  3. Jan 11, 2006 #2

    Danger

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    Only if you provide some means of superheating the steam, such as boiling the water under high pressure or passing the steam tube through a secondary heat source. You can't transfer more heat from a substance than it contains.
    If you mean, can the solution remain liquid at greater than 100° C, I think that the water would just boil off and leave the salt behind. Someone better check me on that, though.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2006
  4. Jan 11, 2006 #3

    Hootenanny

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    I agree. As I understand it, the liquid may well be at a temperature greater than 373K due to ions dissolved in solution but the steam can only ever be at 373K unless the stream itself is heated in a secondary process.
     
  5. Jan 11, 2006 #4

    Danger

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    I just double-checked, and I was wrong about solutions. Since the salt lowers the vapour pressure of the water, saline has a boiling point above that of pure water. In that case, superheated steam could indeed raise its temperature higher than 100° C and still let it remain a liquid. You still can't raise the temperature of the initial steam higher than that just by boiling water, though.
     
  6. Jan 11, 2006 #5

    Bystander

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    First two guesses don't count. Can you answer correctly with number three?
     
  7. Jan 11, 2006 #6

    Danger

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    Okay, what did I miss this time? :redface:
     
  8. Jan 11, 2006 #7

    Bystander

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    Enthalpy of dilution.
     
  9. Jan 11, 2006 #8

    Danger

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    In English, please. :tongue:
    Remember, I never finished high-school.
     
  10. Jan 11, 2006 #9

    Bystander

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    Sol'n(pick your solute, solvent, and concentration; T) + Solvent(same; T) mixed to form Sol'n(same solute, same solvent, new concentration, less than original) PLUS enthalpy of dilution. Positive, negative, large, small. Not to be confused with enthalpy of solution
     
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