• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products via PF Here!

Heat capacity of water -- experimental determination

18
0
1. Homework Statement
A quantity of water in a beaker of negligible thermal capacity is cooled to a few degrees below freezing point. The beaker is then placed in a warm room, and the times recorded at which it is at various temperatures as it gradually warms. The observations were:

temperature/ºC time/min:
-3.0 0
-2.0 0.93
-1.0 1.89
0 2.92
.....
0 169.72
1.0 171.84
2.0 174.04
3.0 176.34

2. Homework Equations
[tex] Q=C \Delta T [/tex]
[tex] Q= L [/tex]
[tex] Q= P \Delta t [/tex]

3. The Attempt at a Solution

My question concerns part b)
I assume the power delivered to the system is constant.
So [tex] Q=C \Delta T = P \Delta t [/tex] or
[tex] \frac{\Delta t}{\Delta T} = C/P = const [/tex]

So I fit a straight line to the experimental points to determine the slope and so to know C/P.
There will be two heat capacities, one for ice and the other for liquid water. I can determine the ratio o C_ice / C_water, and also of the latent heat necessary to melt the ice by noting that

[tex] P \frac{\Delta t_1}{\Delta T} = C [/tex]
[tex] P \Delta t_2 = L [/tex]
[tex] \Delta t_2 \frac{\Delta T}{\Delta t_1} = L / C [/tex]

I can find the heat capacities and latent heats with respect to one another, but I can't seem to know how find one of them in "absolute terms". My question is if that is possible, and what other quantitative results can be obtained from the observations?
 

haruspex

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
2018 Award
31,670
4,667
Please state exactly what the question asks for.
 
18
0
Sorry I forgot tho type that part of the problem:

a) Explain the general form of the experimental results.
b) What quantitative results can you deduce from the observations?

For part a) I have to explain that heat is transfered to the ice, increasing its temperature, till it reaches 0ºC. Then it stays at that temperature untill all the ice has melted away, because all the heat entering the system is going into changing the phase of the water instead of increasing its temperature. Once the ice has melted, the temperature rises again, this time at a different rate than before because water has a different specific heat capacity than ice.
 

haruspex

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
2018 Award
31,670
4,667
Sorry I forgot tho type that part of the problem:

a) Explain the general form of the experimental results.
b) What quantitative results can you deduce from the observations?

For part a) I have to explain that heat is transfered to the ice, increasing its temperature, till it reaches 0ºC. Then it stays at that temperature untill all the ice has melted away, because all the heat entering the system is going into changing the phase of the water instead of increasing its temperature. Once the ice has melted, the temperature rises again, this time at a different rate than before because water has a different specific heat capacity than ice.
Then I think you are finished. As you say, you cannot determine the heat capacities of the water sample in its different phases, let alone the capacities per unit mass. All you can provide is the ratios between them.
 

Want to reply to this thread?

"Heat capacity of water -- experimental determination" You must log in or register to reply here.

Related Threads for: Heat capacity of water -- experimental determination

Replies
5
Views
5K
  • Posted
Replies
3
Views
694
  • Posted
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Posted
Replies
0
Views
3K
  • Posted
Replies
3
Views
10K
Replies
1
Views
623

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top