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How can I convert Newtons to Henrys?

  1. Feb 6, 2013 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I'm in high school and I haven't taken physics yet, but I'm doing a science project where I'm comparing a space shuttle liftoff to a liftoff using a magnetic field created by coils. I found the force that the space shuttle uses at liftoff and now I have to scale it down. When I scale it down, how can I convert it to Henrys so I can use the right amount of power. Am I thinking in the right direction?

    I'm sorry if this is a newbie question, its just I don't have much guidance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 6, 2013 #2

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  4. Feb 7, 2013 #3

    CWatters

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    What he said. You can't convert between the two.

    However you can calculate the force that a magnet/electromagnet would apply to a piece of metal. You might need to do this when designing a relay - for example when trying to work out the strength of the return spring.

    This might also help..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnet#Force_exerted_by_magnetic_field
     
  5. Feb 7, 2013 #4

    CWatters

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    If you haven't taken any physics yet the links we post above are likely to be too difficult.

    One approach might be to find out the power of the space shuttle engines and then assume that roughly the same sort of power would be required using a magnet solution.

    http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2001/StaverieBoundouris.shtml

    However in practice there would be a bunch of issues. Not least how to get a magnet solution to work over very long distances.

    If you use a rail gun approach the problem is the acceleration needed to reach the required velocity in the short length of the gun.
     
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