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How can i find 0.13r(as in the 3 recurring) as a fraction

  1. Sep 6, 2006 #1
    How can i find 0.13r(as in the 3 recurring) as a fraction

    Can anyone give me an idea of how i can do this?



    :uhh:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 6, 2006 #2
    think of 0.133r as 0.1 + 0.033333r.... and then add the fractions together.
     
  4. Sep 6, 2006 #3

    Hootenanny

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    Hi there harlatt and welcome to PF,

    From wikipedia:
    The whole document can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recurring_decimal

    Hope this helps:smile:
     
  5. Sep 6, 2006 #4
    :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

    Sorry but i rlly dont get none of it lol
     
  6. Sep 6, 2006 #5
    ohhhhhh i get it! cheers thanks sooo much!
     
  7. Sep 6, 2006 #6
    wud it be 3/19 or is tht completely rong
     
  8. Sep 6, 2006 #7
    its not 3/19, but what was your work that got you there, maybe we can point out an error.
     
  9. Sep 6, 2006 #8

    Hootenanny

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    Nope, not quite.
     
  10. Sep 6, 2006 #9
    erm...

    to be honest i dont get it now :(

    im gettin rlly stressed cos ive been on this question for bout an hour nd have no clue
     
  11. Sep 6, 2006 #10
    so the numbe .1333 can easily be divided into 0.1 and 0.033333
    .1 is easy as 1/10
    but using hootenannny's post what would 0.03333333333 in fraction form?
     
  12. Sep 6, 2006 #11
    is it 15/90?
     
  13. Sep 6, 2006 #12

    Hootenanny

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    Okay, so we have the decimal [itex]0.1\dot{3}[/itex]; this can be split into two decimals thus;

    [tex]0.1\dot{3} = 0.1 + 0.0\dot{3}[/tex]

    Now, can you write [itex]0.1[/itex] and [itex]0.0\dot{3}[/itex] as fractions?
     
  14. Sep 6, 2006 #13

    Hootenanny

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    No, but very very close.
     
  15. Sep 6, 2006 #14
    is the whole answer 15/90 ive gone thru what the wikipedia thing has?
     
  16. Sep 6, 2006 #15
    erm......................... illl try agen one sec
     
  17. Sep 6, 2006 #16

    Hootenanny

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    The answer is not 15/90. Try doing what was suggested above and show your work
     
  18. Sep 6, 2006 #17
    nope im still gettin 15/90

    i went

    0.133333...= 0.1 + 0.033333
    =1/10 + 3/90 = 12/90 + 3/90 = 15/90


    where am i goin rong?
     
  19. Sep 6, 2006 #18
    No, try thinking of what 0.333... is as a fraction, then work out the relationship between that and 0.0333...
     
  20. Sep 6, 2006 #19
    i dont rlly no
     
  21. Sep 6, 2006 #20
    You're nearly there, you just need to add the fractions 1/10 and 3/90 together properly, 1/10 shouldn't become 12/90.
     
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