How could I melt Titanium?

48
2
Titanium's melting point is between 1,600 and 1,700 degrees Celsius. What sort of equipment would I require to melt it? Is there something I can buy and install in my own little area that could melt titanium? Would I be able to power it or can this only be pulled off in a factory?

Thanks.
 

Nugatory

Mentor
12,329
4,807
You'll have to tell us a lot more to get good answers - what quantity are you thinking about, purity required, what material you're starting with, and above all else what you're wanting to do with your melted titanium.
 
48
2
You'll have to tell us a lot more to get good answers - what quantity are you thinking about, purity required, what material you're starting with, and above all else what you're wanting to do with your melted titanium.
True. Say a 30cm x 30cm wide sheet, 1cm thick. Starting with pure Ti. Wanting to pour the melted Ti into a mould.
 

Baluncore

Science Advisor
6,858
2,101
You will need a shielding gas such as argon to prevent oxygen getting into the furnace or the mold during casting.
Use an electric arc or a reducing flame to heat the material in the furnace. Maybe oxy-acetylene will do it.
 

Nidum

Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,990
847
You can at minimum melt Titanium in a crucible using flux and loose cover but it is an uncertain and hazardous process .

Very spectacular when seen in a demonstration but definitely not suitable for DIY use by inexperienced people .

Titanium for serious applications is commonly melted in an induction furnace with inert gas or vacuum to prevent air contamination and actual combustion .

For critical components the entire melting and casting process is done in vacuum or inert gas environment and with controlled temperatures at all points . Cooling is also done at controlled rates .

If your proposed Titanium plate is for any engineering purpose it really needs to be a specific alloy in a specific condition .

I don't see any actual need to cast your own - you could buy same very easily and at just a few percent of cost of trying to cast one yourself .
 
48
2
You will need a shielding gas such as argon to prevent oxygen getting into the furnace or the mold during casting.
Use an electric arc or a reducing flame to heat the material in the furnace. Maybe oxy-acetylene will do it.
Would an electrical arc furnace be easy to acquire, install, and use in one's own workplace?

You can at minimum melt Titanium in a crucible using flux and loose cover but it is an uncertain and hazardous process .

Very spectacular when seen in a demonstration but definitely not suitable for DIY use by inexperienced people .

Titanium for serious applications is commonly melted in an induction furnace with inert gas or vacuum to prevent air contamination and actual combustion .

For critical components the entire melting and casting process is done in vacuum or inert gas environment and with controlled temperatures at all points . Cooling is also done at controlled rates .

If your proposed Titanium plate is for any engineering purpose it really needs to be a specific alloy in a specific condition .

I don't see any actual need to cast your own - you could buy same very easily and at just a few percent of cost of trying to cast one yourself .
What exactly do you mean by "buy same very easily"? And are you talking about a miniature induction furnace?
 

Nidum

Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,990
847
I meant buy the plate .
 
33,383
9,107
I meant buy the plate .
Certainly easier than melting anything, and the result will be much better as well.
There are companies that will create you (nearly) every shape you like.
 

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