In which temperature range does WF_6 melt?

  • #1
Thread moved from the technical forums, so no Homework Template is shown
Hi Everyone

I'm studying material Engineering and i'm currently preparing chemistry for the summer exams.

Now, there is an old exam question which I don't know how to solve:

"In which temperature range does ##[W^{+VI}F_{6}^{-I}]## melt?"

My solution:

Well, the 18-Electron rule is not fulfilled. There is no crystal field stabilization energy since there are no d-electrons and there are no Pi-backbonds. But:
The electronegativity difference is larger then 1.5. Wolfram is a hard acid and Fluor a hard base. The lattice-energy is very high because both compounds are in a high oxidation state and have a small atom radius (especially Fluor).

Based on this i would say ##[W^{+VI}F_{6}^{-I}]## has a melting-point over 1000 degrees Celsius.

I then looked it up on Wikipedia and it says that ##[W^{+VI}F_{6}^{-I}]## is a gas!?

How can one know this?
And is my train of thought correct? Because our professor ask this kind of question every time... He asked it once with ##OsO_{4}##, ##GeCl_{4}##,....

Thanks a lot for your help!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
TeethWhitener
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,849
1,193
What is the geometry of WF6 and what does that tell you about its interactions?
 
  • Like
Likes H Psi equal E Psi
  • #3
What is the geometry of WF6 and what does that tell you about its interactions?
It's an octahedral crystal field. But I don't know what that tells me about its interactions :(
 
  • #4
TeethWhitener
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,849
1,193
It's an octahedral crystal field. But I don't know what that tells me about its interactions :(
Right. So we know that WF6 is neutral and that it's an octahedron with W in the middle and F's completely surrounding the tungsten at each of the six vertices. With this geometry in mind, what do you think will be the dominant interactions when you bring two of these WF6 units close together?
 
  • #5
Right. So we know that WF6 is neutral and that it's an octahedron with W in the middle and F's completely surrounding the tungsten at each of the six vertices. With this geometry in mind, what do you think will be the dominant interactions when you bring two of these WF6 units close together?
I guess there will be coulomb interactions between the non-bonding orbitals of the fluorine?
 
  • #6
TeethWhitener
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,849
1,193
I guess there will be coulomb interactions between the non-bonding orbitals of the fluorine?
The important thing to think of is: will there be significant interaction between the W of one WF6 unit and the F's of another WF6 unit? If yes, then this ionic interaction will dominate the lattice energy (by at least an order of magnitude). If no, then the lattice energy will consist chiefly of the weak dispersion interactions between the fluorines.
 
  • Like
Likes H Psi equal E Psi

Related Threads on In which temperature range does WF_6 melt?

Replies
1
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
404
Replies
4
Views
6K
Replies
5
Views
446
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
962
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
3K
Top