How do the electrons enter the bubble chamber?

In summary, the conversation discusses the entry of electrons into a bubble chamber containing liquid hydrogen. Concerns are raised about the intensity of the electron beam causing an explosion and destroying the chamber. It is mentioned that the bubble chamber is an offspring of the cloud chamber and the electrons are needed to create ionization tracks for particle detection. The possibility of a thinner entrance window for the beam is suggested. The speaker also mentions their experience with a bubble chamber experiment using neutrinos. The potential flammability of hydrogen is addressed and it is noted that high energy electron beams are not typically used in bubble chamber experiments.
  • #1
brucewillus
1
0
How's the electrons of the accelerated electron beam enter the bubble chamber that contains the liquid hydrogen? Wouldn't the high intensity of the electron beam cause a massive explosion and destroy the bubble chamber that has an outer wall of at least quarter inch of steel! I think hydrogen is highly flammable and an high energy electron beam could maybe cut through steel?

The cloud chamber's, that is the predesisor of the bubble chamber, particles are produced by a radioactive isotope that is inserted into the cloud chamber but the bubble chamber that is an offspring of the cloud chamber must somehow let the electrons into the bubble chamber to create the ionization tracks that are used to justify the existence of the subatomic particles and particle physics. Maybe someone could ask the honorable Higgs but don't give him a heart attack since he's such a nice guy and extremely funny.
 
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  • #2
My dissertation long ago was based on a bubble-chamber experiment, but it was with neutrinos which don't have any problem passing through the wall. :cool:

We also saw plenty of muons from cosmic rays and the neutrino-production system, which aren't readily absorbed so a lot of them did make it through the bubble-chamber wall.

If enough electrons (or any other kind of particle for that matter) wouldn't make it through the "normal" wall, there would have to be some kind of "entrance window" which is basically just a thinner section of wall, probably made of a different kind of material, and just wide enough to accommodate the beam.

I've never heard of a bubble-chamber experiment involving an incoming electron beam, but I don't see any problem with one provided the intensity is low enough. Bubble chamber experiments can't easily analyze a large number of nearly simultaneous interactions, so you don't want to make the beam intensity any higher than it needs to be in order to produce a few interactions per photograph.
 
  • #3
Hydrogen on its own is not flammable, it needs oxygen (or some other things) to react with.

There might have been some experiments in early particle physics where an electron beam was shot directly into a bubble chamber, but then the intensity was low.
Accelerator beams energetic enough to cut through things are a more recent development, and those are not shot into bubble chambers.
 

Related to How do the electrons enter the bubble chamber?

1. How does a bubble chamber work to detect electrons?

A bubble chamber is a device used in particle physics experiments to detect and track the paths of charged particles, such as electrons. The chamber is filled with a superheated liquid, such as liquid hydrogen, which is kept just below its boiling point. When a charged particle passes through the liquid, it causes the molecules to ionize and form tiny bubbles along its path, which can be captured by cameras and analyzed to determine the particle's trajectory.

2. How are electrons able to enter the bubble chamber?

Electrons are able to enter the bubble chamber due to their high energy and charge. As they pass through the liquid, they ionize the molecules, causing the formation of bubbles along their path. The size and density of these bubbles can then be used to determine the properties of the electron, such as its energy and direction of movement.

3. What is the purpose of using a superheated liquid in a bubble chamber?

A superheated liquid is used in a bubble chamber because it is highly sensitive to charged particles passing through it. When a particle enters the chamber, it causes the liquid to boil and form bubbles, which can be easily detected and analyzed. This allows scientists to study the properties and behavior of particles, such as electrons, in great detail.

4. How do scientists determine if an electron has entered the bubble chamber?

Scientists can determine if an electron has entered the bubble chamber by analyzing the bubbles formed along its path. Each bubble corresponds to a charged particle passing through the liquid, and the size and density of the bubbles can provide valuable information about the particle's properties. Additionally, other detection methods, such as magnetic fields, can be used to confirm the presence of an electron.

5. What other particles besides electrons can enter a bubble chamber?

Besides electrons, a bubble chamber can detect and track the paths of other charged particles, such as protons, neutrons, and muons. It can also detect and study the behavior of particles produced in high-energy collisions, such as pions, kaons, and even heavier particles like J/ψ mesons. The versatility of the bubble chamber makes it a valuable tool for studying a wide range of particles and their interactions.

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