How do you calculate resultant velocity?

In summary, to calculate resultant velocity using vectors, you need to find the individual velocities in both horizontal and vertical directions and use the Pythagorean theorem and trigonometric functions. Resultant velocity takes into account both magnitude and direction, while average velocity only considers change in position. To calculate resultant velocity with multiple forces, find individual velocities and use vector addition. Resultant velocity can be negative if the object is moving in the opposite direction. Mass does not directly affect the calculation, but it does play a role in overall motion.
  • #1
chestycougth
15
0
Say I have a boat moving at 10 m/s south (160 degrees) ina river that is flowing at 3 m/s east (90 degrees)

How would you calculate the resultant velocity in this instance?
 
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  • #2
Do you know about trigonometry and vectors? (hint: draw the velocities as vectors)

(by the way, are you sure you don't mean 180 degrees when you said "south"?)
 

1. How do you calculate resultant velocity using vectors?

To calculate resultant velocity using vectors, you first need to determine the individual velocities in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Then, use the Pythagorean theorem to find the magnitude of the resultant velocity and use trigonometric functions to find the direction of the resultant velocity.

2. What is the difference between resultant velocity and average velocity?

Resultant velocity is the overall velocity of an object, taking into account both magnitude and direction. Average velocity, on the other hand, only considers the change in position over time and does not take direction into account.

3. How do you calculate resultant velocity when there are multiple forces acting on an object?

To calculate resultant velocity when multiple forces are acting on an object, you need to first find the individual velocities caused by each force. Then, use vector addition to find the resultant velocity by adding the individual velocities together.

4. Can resultant velocity be negative?

Yes, resultant velocity can be negative. This means that the object is moving in the opposite direction of the positive direction that was chosen. It is important to take direction into account when calculating resultant velocity.

5. How does mass affect the calculation of resultant velocity?

Mass does not directly affect the calculation of resultant velocity. However, it does play a role in the overall motion of an object. Objects with larger masses will require more force to change their velocity compared to objects with smaller masses.

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