How Do You Guys Keep Up with New Textbook Releases?

  • Other
  • Thread starter Amrator
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Textbook
In summary, the conversation discusses methods for finding new physics and math textbooks. Some suggestions include browsing online retailers, visiting used bookstores, and checking out lists of new releases. It is also mentioned that there may not be a need for constantly updated textbooks in certain subjects, as the main ideas have already been covered in older books. Additionally, one member mentions their own book, and another suggests speaking with a representative from a publishing company for recommendations. Overall, there are various ways to discover new textbooks, and it is important to carefully consider whether a new book is truly necessary or if previously published books cover the same material.
  • #1
Amrator
246
83
Like many of you, I love physics and math textbooks. I'm always on the look out for new textbooks that will aid in my understand of both subjects. But it's just not practical to scroll through Amazon all the time to find new textbooks. How do you guys go about it?

For example, I really love the Student's Guide series. How do I find more new books similar to this series?
 
  • Like
Likes dsatkas, Demystifier and PhDeezNutz
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I don’t really “keep up” with new textbook releases because new textbooks can be expensive.

Where I live there is a chain of used book stores called “half price books” that sometimes has old textbooks for really cheap.

I’ve bought numerous Dover books from there for less than $10.

Also you have piqued my curiosity with “Student’s Guide”. I might buy some titles.
 
  • Like
Likes AbyssalPloy
  • #3
Every couple of months Physics Today has a list of new releases.
 
  • Like
  • Informative
Likes jasonRF, berkeman and vanhees71
  • #4
By the way, books always look better the first time you look at them. I generally place books I find of interest in my amazon cart and let them sit there for SEVERAL weeks before making a purchase decision. Time is a very effective sieve.
 
  • Like
Likes vanhees71, Hamiltonian, PhDeezNutz and 2 others
  • #5
At the risk of getting "that's ignorance", here is my take: I believe there are subjects in science where there is literally no need for new textbooks for university learners. Any science topic meant for learning has at least 5 textbooks which should 99,9% cover the whole story for the regular 4-5 years of study. Take for example fluid mechanics or general topology. What more can you add in 2022 in a book that has not been covered in the 1951-2000 half-century? Sure, there are topics in computer science and microbiology in which the need to write the new discoveries in a structured form in the textbooks is bigger, but most of the topics are really exhausted, and all books appearing yearly or every couple of years are nothing but commercial mash-ups of the same content.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes jasonRF, CGandC, russ_watters and 4 others
  • #6
Amazon recommendations, this forum, citations in papers, ...
 
  • Like
Likes vanhees71
  • #8
  • Haha
  • Like
  • Wow
Likes dsatkas, Hamiltonian, berkeman and 3 others
  • #10
vanhees71 said:
Physics Today just brought out it's list of new books:

https:
Our member @Orodruin just published a book on problems in relativity, or am I wrong?
 
  • Like
Likes Hamiltonian, gentzen, Demystifier and 1 other person
  • #11
He did indeed! :smile:

(check out his updated avatar)
 
  • Like
Likes Demystifier and vanhees71
  • #12
dextercioby said:
Our member @Orodruin just published a book on problems in relativity, or am I wrong?
That seems accurate.

As for the question in the OP, there are many ways. One of the ways not mentioned is that as faculty I get a visit from a gentleman from Cambridge University Press who is more than happy to ask about my current teaching, what textbooks I am currently using and to discuss what new textbooks they have that could be of interest.
 
  • Like
Likes Hamiltonian, PhDeezNutz, Demystifier and 1 other person
  • #13
It reminds me that my professor of Mechanics course was called to the faculty's secretary office and was told that he hadn't updated the syllabus of the course since he started teaching it. He told them that there was nothing to change since the theory of Mechanics hasn't changed for a hundered and more years, therefore there's nothing to change.

Like @dextercioby said, most new releases of a certain subject are regurgitations of the main, canonical ideas one studies at a university course relevant to the subject. For example, if you will study Mechanics, you will see many textbooks teaching the same topics like Gyroscopic rotations, non-uniform acceleration, Work-Energy theorem... . Difference can be that some books might present some topics in a way that is more suitable to your understanding, but overall, I think in every field ( topology, mechanics, quantum mechanics, algorithms ) you will find canonical books which will teach you very well about at-least 90% of the material you'll ever need in those subjects in order to say " I know X " where X is the topic itself.
 
  • Like
Likes vanhees71 and dextercioby
  • #14
If I want to read a new textbook, I write one.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Likes PhDeezNutz, vanhees71 and berkeman

Related to How Do You Guys Keep Up with New Textbook Releases?

1. How often are new textbooks released?

New textbooks are typically released on an annual basis, although some subjects may have new releases every few years.

2. How do you decide which textbooks to use?

The decision on which textbooks to use is typically made by a committee of educators and experts in the field. They consider factors such as content, relevance, and accuracy.

3. How do you keep up with changes in the subject matter?

We stay updated on changes in the subject matter by regularly attending conferences, workshops, and seminars. We also stay in communication with other educators and experts in the field.

4. Do you only use new textbooks or do you also use older editions?

We strive to use the most current and up-to-date textbooks, but in some cases, older editions may still be relevant and useful. However, we do our best to incorporate new editions when possible.

5. How do you ensure the accuracy of the information in new textbooks?

Before selecting a new textbook, we thoroughly review and evaluate the content to ensure accuracy. We also rely on feedback and reviews from other educators and experts in the field.

Similar threads

  • Science and Math Textbooks
2
Replies
39
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
19
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
7
Views
654
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
29
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
2
Views
940
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
12
Views
2K
Back
Top