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How fast would a man's combat speed be if he kicked a Cannonball?

  1. May 11, 2012 #1
    Ok another speed question thread.

    If a man who is 1400lbs jumped 5 feet in the air and performed a 360 degree spin and kicked a cannonball away,then how fast would he be?

    Assumptions:

    Lets assume that the CanonBall moves at 1500fps
    Lets assume that the Cannonball was 2 feet away from him before he performed this feat.
    Lets assume that his body is durable enough to do so.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. May 11, 2012 #2

    Drakkith

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    Are you asking how fast his kick would be? I think we need a little more info, like the length of the mans legs.
     
  4. May 11, 2012 #3
    Well no his movement as a whole but if you want you can calculate his kick.His feet would be about 3ft.Look,at the Op,for what his body would look like
     
  5. May 11, 2012 #4

    HallsofIvy

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    Well, we can say one thing- he will have lost a foot and would quickly bleed to death!

    (There are tales of soldiers in the American Civil War sticking a foot out to stop a cannon ball rolling slowly past at the end of its trajectory- not realizing that the ball still carried enough energy to take a foot off.)
     
  6. May 11, 2012 #5
    Umm I put up a hypothetical setting.
     
  7. May 11, 2012 #6

    HallsofIvy

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    "Hypothetical" shouldn't mean "ignore reality"!
     
  8. May 11, 2012 #7
    I said lets assume that his body is durable enough to do so,so that means that his foot wont be taken off by the Canon-Ball if he "performed this feat".

    This is based off of a fictional character btw.
     
  9. May 11, 2012 #8

    Vanadium 50

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    The problem is you are ascribing a number of magical properties to the situation, and asking what the physics would be. That tends not to work - you can't do a calculation "sometimes" ignoring reality.
     
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