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How important is interest in learning physics?

  • Thread starter cs23
  • Start date
66
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If i find interest in it, would it make it easier to understand?

If so, what are some ways of forming interest?

I usually just study so as to pass a test.Which hasnt worked well for me. I just do enough to so that i can solve problems that will be similar to tests
 
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If i find interest in it, would it make it easier to understand?
Certainly!! Finding something interesting helps a lot! But it's not the only thing you need to pass tests. You'll also need patience and hard work. But if you're interested in something, then the hard work comes easy...

If so, what are some ways of forming interest?
I'm not sure. Are you taking physics in high school right now?? If so, then there are probably some ways to envoce interest in physics. You'll want to connect physics to your other interests somehow. For example: if you like programming, then you can make a program that simulates physical laws.
You can also try some experiments at home. Or you can try to "do projects" at home, maybe you'll get intrigued that way...
Or compete in a local science fair. Basically anything so that you'll get hands on experience with physics...

So, what's your story? In what grade are you, what kind of physics do you like? What are your interests at the moment? How do you see your future after high school??
 

fss

1,176
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If you're not interested in physics you're probably not going to learn very much. Sounds like you need to work in a different field.
 
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Certainly!! Finding something interesting helps a lot! But it's not the only thing you need to pass tests. You'll also need patience and hard work. But if you're interested in something, then the hard work comes easy...



I'm not sure. Are you taking physics in high school right now?? If so, then there are probably some ways to envoce interest in physics. You'll want to connect physics to your other interests somehow. For example: if you like programming, then you can make a program that simulates physical laws.
You can also try some experiments at home. Or you can try to "do projects" at home, maybe you'll get intrigued that way...
Or compete in a local science fair. Basically anything so that you'll get hands on experience with physics...

So, what's your story? In what grade are you, what kind of physics do you like? What are your interests at the moment? How do you see your future after high school??

I'm in university, ive been able to get to where i am today because of 'training'. I just make sure to do what the professors say so i can get good on tests. Usually the questions they assign and do in lecture are similar to their test problems,so people can pass. All i do is make sure i know how to solve those problems. But i can never solve those problems on my own, without looking at the solutions.

Also, i just read to know the formulas. Not much thinking involved. If i developed interest i feel i could improve understanding.

Could you tell me how you study. How you read the text to solving complicated problems. How you think through a problem?
 

Pengwuino

Gold Member
4,854
10
If you're at a university, talk to people about physics, attend seminars, learn about research.

If none of this helps, get out of the field. You're training to do something for the rest of your life. If it doesn't interest you as a student, where you're free to let your mind pretty much wander and learn, then it is going to be a disaster when you're in a job where you also have to deal with the negative aspects of having a job.
 
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Wait, you're at university studying physics? Why did you choose to do physics if you're not interested in it??

Seriously, if physics doesn't interest you at all, then choose another major! You will be glad you did...
 

Nabeshin

Science Advisor
2,204
16
Usually the questions they assign and do in lecture are similar to their test problems,so people can pass. All i do is make sure i know how to solve those problems. But i can never solve those problems on my own, without looking at the solutions.

Also, i just read to know the formulas. Not much thinking involved.
If this is honestly how your physics classes are that's quite sad, since it seems you are not learning physics at all! In which case, I cannot really blame you for not being interested. Out of curiosity, which year of study are you in?
 
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I in second year of engineering. Most of my courses have been taught by the physics department. Only a handful from my mechanical engineering department. Though in third year i believe more courses will be taught by my department
 

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