How is the thermal conductivity affected by magnetic field?

In summary, the thermal conductivity of a material is affected by the presence of a magnetic field. This is due to the interaction between the magnetic field and the movement of electrons within the material, which can hinder or enhance thermal transport. The extent of this effect depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field, as well as the properties of the material itself. Understanding this relationship is important in various fields, such as materials science and engineering, where precise control of thermal conductivity is crucial.
  • #1
Seyit KAPLAN
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Hello,
I'm searching for how magnetic field affects the thermal conductivity of the metal (such as steel in solid form). If someone suggests any article about it will be very helpful.
 
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  • #2
Why should it?
 
  • #3
Vanadium 50 said:
Why should it?
If it doesn't, also why?
 
  • #4
Seyit KAPLAN said:
If it doesn't, also why?
Welcome to PF Seyit. :welcome:

Why? Because they are not connected. That's not a very good question.
 
  • #5
If such an effect exists, it is certainly not a standard part of materials physics. You could perhaps handwave an argument for it that electrical and thermal conductivity are related through phonon mechanisms, and electrical magnetoresistance is a thing, so perhaps thermal magnetoconductance is a thing? There is also the concept of spintronics and spinon conductance, where there might be something analogous to phonon heat transfer for spinons.

I surmised that such a phonemonon could be called magnetothermoconductance, and found one paper on it from 1992: http://jetp.ac.ru/cgi-bin/dn/e_074_03_0574.pdf It may also be mentioned in this paper, which I don't have access to right now: https://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/9789812701879_0029 There was also one hit for magnetothermoresistance, where I just have the title: Thermoelectric properties and negative magnetothermoresistance effect in Te wires

Refining my search a bit to look at spintronics, I found this paper (and others) talking about magnetocalorimetrics, the relationship between magnetic and thermal effects: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1107.4395.pdf (arxiv because free, search for peer reviewed if you want). That paper has descriptions of the magnetic Pelletier effect, magnetic Seebeck effect, thermal Hall effect, which I think are up your alley.

So I guess to answer your question, it's conceivable that such an effect exists, but it's fairly obscure. The more serious treatment of spintronics is fairly new, so maybe give it a few years or decades.
 
  • #6
Seyit KAPLAN said:
I'm searching for how magnetic field affects the thermal conductivity of the metal (such as steel in solid form). If someone suggests any article about it will be very helpful.
I suppose it might, since it can affect the electrical conductivity. You could also probably fabricate materials that did have a connection between applied magnetic field and thermal conductivity, similar to how liquid crystals can be used to alter the optical properties of a material when an external electric field is applied.

Maybe start here and follow some of the references and add Google search terms to see where it takes you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetoresistance

BTW, is this question for a schoolwork assignment? It kind of sounds like one...
 
  • #7
To the OP: google " thermal conductivity and magnetic properties in metals" and then ask questions as necessary. You can also substitute "ferromagnetic metals".
The effects are likely not very large.
 
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  • #8
klotza said:
If such an effect exists, it is certainly not a standard part of materials physics. You could perhaps handwave an argument for it that electrical and thermal conductivity are related through phonon mechanisms, and electrical magnetoresistance is a thing, so perhaps thermal magnetoconductance is a thing? There is also the concept of spintronics and spinon conductance, where there might be something analogous to phonon heat transfer for spinons.

I surmised that such a phonemonon could be called magnetothermoconductance, and found one paper on it from 1992: http://jetp.ac.ru/cgi-bin/dn/e_074_03_0574.pdf It may also be mentioned in this paper, which I don't have access to right now: https://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/9789812701879_0029 There was also one hit for magnetothermoresistance, where I just have the title: Thermoelectric properties and negative magnetothermoresistance effect in Te wires

Refining my search a bit to look at spintronics, I found this paper (and others) talking about magnetocalorimetrics, the relationship between magnetic and thermal effects: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1107.4395.pdf (arxiv because free, search for peer reviewed if you want). That paper has descriptions of the magnetic Pelletier effect, magnetic Seebeck effect, thermal Hall effect, which I think are up your alley.

So I guess to answer your question, it's conceivable that such an effect exists, but it's fairly obscure. The more serious treatment of spintronics is fairly new, so maybe give it a few years or decades.
Thanks for your kind and detailed reply, I already read some of these articles, but I couldn't find enough explanations.
 
  • #9
berkeman said:
I suppose it might, since it can affect the electrical conductivity. You could also probably fabricate materials that did have a connection between applied magnetic field and thermal conductivity, similar to how liquid crystals can be used to alter the optical properties of a material when an external electric field is applied.

Maybe start here and follow some of the references and add Google search terms to see where it takes you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetoresistance

BTW, is this question for a schoolwork assignment? It kind of sounds like one...
First of all thanks for your reply, I'm studying on my PhD thesis, it is not directly relevant my subject, but i am quiete interested in physic. I already checked on wikipedia and followed all steps. You wrote that it can affect the electrical conductivity, can you explain how? Because i think it is quiete similar behavior to thermal conductivity.
 
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  • #10
anorlunda said:
Why? Because they are not connected.
Not sure about that. As the effect isn't discussed much, it would be very slight / negligible and these days, devices are designed to make use of almost any significant effect you could think of. I was thinking about the Hall effect, which would be related to 'effective' electrical conductance of a length of semiconductor - by deflecting electron flow. In substances where thermal conductivity is via electrons, the electrons would have longer curved paths (old model of course). Couldn't that affect thermal conductivity?
 
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  • #11
Seyit KAPLAN said:
I'm studying on my PhD thesis, it is not directly relevant my subject, but i am quiete interested in physic.
Can you say what field your PhD is in and what your background is in math and physics? That will help to guide how we frame our answers.
Seyit KAPLAN said:
You wrote that it can affect the electrical conductivity, can you explain how?
I got to the Magnetoresistance page via the Hall Effect page, since the Hall Effect in semiconductors is a pretty well-known effect, and seemed like it could be related to a change in resistance (because of current bunching). Have you read the Wikipedia article that I linked to? If so, can you ask specific questions about their description that is not making sense to you? Thanks.
 
  • #12
If there is a change in the resistance, a reconstruction of the Fermi surface, or a change in electron scattering then there will be some change in the thermal conductivity because electrons are one of the carriers of energy in metals. Magnetic fields applied to metals can do all those things. The question is: how big is the effect? In most cases, I think the effect will be a tiny fraction of the overall thermal conductivity.

You are asking about steel. Could you be more specific about the situation you are thinking about, especially the expected temperature range and the degree of magnetization or applied field?
 
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  • #13
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Related to How is the thermal conductivity affected by magnetic field?

1. How does the thermal conductivity change in the presence of a magnetic field?

The thermal conductivity of a material is affected by the presence of a magnetic field due to the interaction between the magnetic field and the material's electrons. This interaction can either increase or decrease the thermal conductivity, depending on the material's properties and the strength of the magnetic field.

2. What factors influence the effect of magnetic field on thermal conductivity?

The effect of a magnetic field on thermal conductivity is influenced by several factors, including the type of material, the strength and direction of the magnetic field, and the temperature of the material. Additionally, the presence of impurities or defects in the material can also affect the thermal conductivity in the presence of a magnetic field.

3. Can magnetic fields be used to control thermal conductivity?

Yes, magnetic fields can be used to control thermal conductivity in certain materials. By adjusting the strength and direction of the magnetic field, scientists can manipulate the movement of electrons and thus alter the thermal conductivity of the material. This has potential applications in fields such as thermoelectric devices and thermal management systems.

4. Is there a relationship between thermal conductivity and magnetic susceptibility?

There is a correlation between thermal conductivity and magnetic susceptibility, as both properties are affected by the movement of electrons in a material. However, the exact relationship between the two varies depending on the material and the strength of the magnetic field.

5. How is the thermal conductivity affected by magnetic field strength?

The thermal conductivity is typically increased with the strength of the magnetic field, up to a certain point. Beyond this point, the thermal conductivity may decrease as the magnetic field becomes too strong and starts to disrupt the movement of electrons. The exact relationship between thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength varies depending on the material and other factors.

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