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How large are math courses at u of toronto?

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  • Thread starter ode_to_joy
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

So I have been told that there are about two thousand freshmen in bio in one lecture room at u of t. I believe it is becasue these courses are highly in demand. How about math courses (157 or 137)? How large are the class size? Hopefull there aren't many students who take analysis and algebra courses in year 1
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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I've heard from a friend that I know that his first year math classes were ~400-500 students for things like Calculus I, and that the class sizes exponentially decrease over the years, so that when you are taking Lebesgue Measure and Integration, there are only about 15 people in the class.
 
  • #3
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500? I was expecting 2000!
 
  • #4
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MAT135 and MAT137 will definitely have larger class sizes. However, if you're taking MAT157, you'll see about 50-100 people, and a bunch of them will drop out by the first midterm.
 
  • #5
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I will take 157 then hahahahahahahahahah :)
 
  • #6
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157 is definitely a great course. A lot of fun too, if you're interested in the material!
 
  • #7
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2000 students in one lecture hall? These lecture halls must be massive.........
 
  • #8
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MAT135 and MAT137 will definitely have larger class sizes. However, if you're taking MAT157, you'll see about 50-100 people, and a bunch of them will drop out by the first midterm.
This really intimidates me... I don't know if I can survive...
 
  • #9
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This really intimidates me... I don't know if I can survive...
Most of the people drop out because they aren't confident, don't have good study habits, and aren't able to understand the new approach they're taking to math. I think MAT157 is an Analysis I course which is your first introduction to proofs with Spivak. If you want to get used to proofs because that makes you feel better I know micromass usually recommends people to get Velleman's How to Prove It and Spivak's Calculus.

Here's the course homepage: http://www.math.toronto.edu/murty/teaching.htm
 
  • #10
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Most of the people drop out because they aren't confident, don't have good study habits, and aren't able to understand the new approach they're taking to math. I think MAT157 is an Analysis I course which is your first introduction to proofs with Spivak. If you want to get used to proofs if that makes you feel better I know micromass usually recommends people to get Velleman's How to Prove It and Spivak's Calculus.
so if I work really hard than I wouldn't fail. thanks, that makes me feel a lot better
 
  • #11
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so if I work really hard than I wouldn't fail. thanks, that makes me feel a lot better
I think this is the case in most Analysis courses. I think a fair amount of people can pass Analysis if they work very hard without the having the mathematical mind. It's when you get into more abstract areas such as algebraic topology, algebraic curves, mathematical logic, etc... that you require not only hard work but a fair bit of a mathematical mind (notice my lack of the word intelligence since I don't think being good at math necessarily constitutes a greater intelligence - in most cases though, such a statement is correct).
 
  • #12
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This really intimidates me... I don't know if I can survive...
you shouldn't be too intimidated. By the first mid term, the class usually starts going into "delta-epsilon" proofs, and people get scared of those and drop out. They aren't so bad, and once you understand those proofs, you're set!
 
  • #14
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