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How long does shuttle re-entry burn last?

  1. Dec 28, 2009 #1
    So as the title states, I would like to know how long the space shuttle's re-entry burn last? I know that it get to about 1500 C and why it burns I just want to know how long it lasts.

    And as a second question as an add on, is there any flexible material that can withstand that heat for that amount of time?

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 28, 2009 #2

    DavidSnider

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    It lasts about 30 minutes.

    Not sure about the second question.
     
  4. Dec 28, 2009 #3
    That sounds long...are you sure about that?
     
  5. Dec 28, 2009 #4
    Thats what I was thinking, I'm almost sure that the entire re-entry is less than 30 minutes.
     
  6. Dec 28, 2009 #5

    DavidSnider

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    From what I read Atmosphere to Touchdown is 35 minutes.
     
  7. Dec 28, 2009 #6
    I'm just looking for the time the shuttle is in the 1500 Celcius area, not how long the entire re-entry is.
     
  8. Dec 28, 2009 #7

    DavidSnider

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    I'm rechecking what I read, that does sound a bit long. Maybe I missed something.
     
  9. Dec 28, 2009 #8

    RonL

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    I'm not sure where the burn starts, but when the shuttle passes over Waco Texas it is still glowing like an arch weld moving across the sky.:smile:

    Ron
     
  10. Dec 28, 2009 #9

    DavidSnider

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  11. Dec 28, 2009 #10
    I was trying t figure this out, and I just read that there never actually is an ionization blackout for the space shuttle, as the hot ionized gases don't ever fully envelop it. I guess different sources give different info...
     
  12. Dec 28, 2009 #11
    Ok that is helpful, but I do have another question:

    What is the altitude from the beginning of the burn to the end, like vertical height, not distance flown by the shuttle?
     
  13. Dec 28, 2009 #12
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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