1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

How much force I have to apply to throw a stone out of orbit?

Tags:
  1. Nov 12, 2014 #1
    I know escape velocity. in order to get out of earth's orbit the object has to maintain 11.2 km/s speed.

    But If I want to throw a 1kg stone out of orbit... how much force I have to apply?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 12, 2014 #2

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Any force above 10N can eventually get it to escape if you apply it for long enough....do you have any more specifics of the scenario you are interested in?
     
  4. Nov 12, 2014 #3
    Thank you very much for reply. please tell me this also. how long I have to apply that force... consider a scenario hat I have a stone in my hand.. then How much for I have to apply ? Its Like one time force. I wont apply for long time like rocket...does any object has to maintain its 11.2km/s speed until it gets out of orbit?
     
  5. Nov 12, 2014 #4
    I got the answer thank you
     
  6. Nov 12, 2014 #5

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    If you applied that force for about 13 hours, you'd reach escape velocity.

    So I'm really not sure what you are after, but if you use a=f/m and s=at you can calculate how much speed you'll gain for a certain force over a certain time. Obviously, if you want to apply the force for a short one, you'll need a very large force (like if you want to use a cannon).
     
  7. Nov 12, 2014 #6
    How much Force please tell me... how much is that very large force? consider of it is a canon tell me please
     
  8. Nov 12, 2014 #7

    jbriggs444

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Escape energy for a given mass is given by ##e = \frac{mv^2}{2}## where m is the mass and v is escape velocity.

    Energy imparted by a throw from your hand is given by ##e = Fd## where d is the distance covered by your hand during the throw and F is the force that you apply throughout the throw.

    You know m and v. You can estimate d. Solve for F.
     
  9. Nov 12, 2014 #8

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    We can't just tell you. It depends on the specifics of the scenario you are interested in, which you haven't told us!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook