How to copy a NON commercial DVD (home made) to another DVD

  • Thread starter yungman
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In summary: Nero is a popular commercial program.In summary, it seems that @yungman wants to make a copy of some DVD recordings he made before to a new DVD, but is having difficulty doing so because the videos are too large to be copied onto the new DVD. He suggests converting the videos into a different format before burning onto the new DVD.
  • #1
yungman
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TL;DR Summary
I am NOT talking about copy some store bought movies that is copy right. Only some video I have put on DVD before and I want to make a copy.
I want to make a copy of some DVD I recorded before to a new DVD, what is the easiest way to do it?

I am NOT asking for how to bypass copy right, it's my own videos. I tried to just copy into my desktop, it works if I play on the laptop, but when I try to burn on a new DVD, it said the file is too big.
 
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  • #2
Why do you need multiple copies of a recorded movie?
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
Why do you need multiple copies of a recorded movie?
give it to my stepson. Not just movie, I have some videos of us and grand daughter(his daughter) I want to give to him. I only have it on DVD. Also some tv shows from CBS I recorded.

Funny, I literally took a smaller size video from old DVD, copy onto the desk top, then burn onto a blank disk. I can watch it on the laptop, but it won't play on the DVD player.

Do I even need to download any software to do this. For non copy right stuffs, I thought it should be simple copy in and burn to a blank disk. Why it doesn't work but I can run it on the laptop?
 
  • #4
yungman said:
it's my own videos.

yungman said:
Also some tv shows from CBS I recorded.
Which is it?
 
  • #5
yungman said:
give it to my stepson. Not just movie
Can you just loan your personal copy to your stepson for a while, and get it back later? Kind of like a book that you buy -- you can loan it to friends without infringing on the book's copyright, since there is only that one copy that you paid for in circulation. Scanning the book and giving away copies seems like it would violate the copyright of the work.

I'm no expert in copyrights, but in my brief search for recording DVDs of movies that you pay to watch (for me it would be via Xfinity at home) they can be subject to copyright restrictions.
 
  • #6
berkeman said:
Can you just loan your personal copy to your stepson for a while, and get it back later? Kind of like a book that you buy -- you can loan it to friends without infringing on the book's copyright, since there is only that one copy that you paid for in circulation. Scanning the book and giving away copies seems like it would violate the copyright of the work.

I'm no expert in copyrights, but in my brief search for recording DVDs of movies that you pay to watch (for me it would be via Xfinity at home) they can be subject to copyright restrictions.
No, even movies are just from FX channel, none are even new movie, I am too cheap to even get premium channels. You know Direct tv allow you to record movies also.

I think I just need to convert the VLC file to MP4, no copy right restriction or anything.
 
  • #7
Data dvds usually don’t play on DVD players. The players require a certain file structure and set of files to be present. You can see that when you use a file explorer to view the commercial dvd on your computer. You may need to convert the movie to a dvd file format structure in order for it to work. I have never done this.

I did find this writeup that explains things in more detail

https://www.winxdvd.com/resource/free-convert-mpeg-to-dvd.htm
 
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  • #9
Baluncore said:
It seems to me that @yungman didn't express an interest in 'ripping' DVDs; rather, he apparently wants to convert digital media files (e.g. MPEG, MP4, AVI) to DVD format so that he can burn his existing homemade or 'fair use' video recordings to DVDs that can be played on any DVD player instead of only (or mainly) on a computer. DVD file structure is expained here: https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Category:Book:Inside_DVD-Video. The VOB container file format is explained here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VOB. The winxdvd site mentioned by @jedishrfu site has a free version of its DVD authoring software available for download here: https://www.winxdvd.com/dvd-author/
 
  • #10
sysprog said:
It seems to me that @yungman didn't express an interest in 'ripping' DVDs;
I was reading between the lines.
 
  • #11
Baluncore said:
I was reading between the lines.
Judging from some of @yungman's prior posts, it seems to me that he's very much a family man, and I'm not especially skeptical regarding his statements outlining his purposes in the matter.
 
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  • #13
Any CD / DVD creating software should have the ability to copy discs. I would just do a web search for DVD writing freeware software.
 

1. Can I legally copy a non-commercial DVD?

It is generally legal to make a copy of a non-commercial DVD for personal, non-commercial use. However, it is important to check the copyright laws in your country to ensure that you are not infringing on any intellectual property rights.

2. What equipment do I need to copy a non-commercial DVD?

To copy a DVD, you will need a computer with a DVD burner, blank DVDs, and DVD copying software. Some computers may already have DVD burning capabilities, but if not, you will need to purchase a DVD burner and install it on your computer.

3. How do I copy a non-commercial DVD to another DVD?

The exact steps for copying a DVD may vary depending on the software you are using, but in general, you will need to insert the original DVD into your computer's DVD drive, open the DVD copying software, and follow the prompts to select the source and destination drives and begin the copying process.

4. Can I copy a non-commercial DVD if it is protected?

Some non-commercial DVDs may have copy protection measures in place to prevent unauthorized copying. In these cases, you may need to use specialized software or methods to bypass the protection and successfully copy the DVD.

5. Is there a limit to how many times I can copy a non-commercial DVD?

As long as you are copying the DVD for personal, non-commercial use and not distributing it to others, there is generally no limit to how many times you can make copies. However, it is important to respect the intellectual property rights of the creators and not engage in illegal distribution of copyrighted material.

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