How to Derive Answers Using N Formula

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In summary, the conversation is about finding a solution to a given attachment formula and entering it into an Excel spreadsheet. The speaker is not completely sure how the answer was derived and is asking for a step-by-step explanation. They mention the use of the Newton-Raphson approximation method and the need to clarify the units of measurement for the variable $T_2$. Another person suggests looking up a solution method and clarifies that Excel will not automatically solve the equation. The conversation ends with a mention of the OP posting the same question on another site.
  • #1
DYLAN4321
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Hi,

I have been given the attachment formula and asked to enter this into an excel spreadsheet. Although I am not entirely sure how the answer was derived. Is anyone able to explain step by step as I want to try and enter this into an excel spreadsheet. For reference N = Newtons
 

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  • #2
DYLAN4321 said:
Hi,

I have been given the attachment formula and asked to enter this into an excel spreadsheet. Although I am not entirely sure how the answer was derived. Is anyone able to explain step by step as I want to try and enter this into an excel spreadsheet. For reference N = Newtons
I believe you were suggested to look up a solution method, the Newton-Raphson approximation being one method mentioned. Do you have a solution method you would like to use? Excel will not simply solve it for you.

-Dan
 
  • #3
There is no "N" in the given equation so there can be no "N" in the answer! Have you left something out?
 
  • #4
DYLAN4321 said:
I have been given the attachment formula and asked to enter this into an excel spreadsheet.
It is not clear what your Excel formula is supposed to compute: \(\displaystyle \frac{7134611197}{T_2^2}-T_2\) for the given value of $T_2$, the value of $T_2$ for the given left-hand side of this equation or something else. Also, for $T_2=956$ we have \(\displaystyle \frac{7134611197}{T_2^2}-T_2\approx6850\) and not $6863$.

topsquark said:
I believe you were suggested to look up a solution method, the Newton-Raphson approximation being one method mentioned.
Mentioned where? This is a quadratic equation in $T_2$.

HallsofIvy said:
There is no "N" in the given equation
N is the units in which $T_2$ is measured.
 
  • #5
Evgeny.Makarov said:
Mentioned where? This is a quadratic equation in $T_2$.
The OP also posted this on another site. Sorry, I should have included the link to it.

-Dan
 

Related to How to Derive Answers Using N Formula

1. How do I know which formula to use?

The formula you use will depend on the type of problem you are trying to solve. It is important to understand the variables and relationships involved in the problem in order to choose the correct formula.

2. What is the process for deriving answers using a formula?

The process for deriving answers using a formula involves identifying the variables involved in the problem, substituting them into the formula, and performing any necessary calculations to solve for the unknown variable.

3. Can I use the same formula for different types of problems?

Some formulas can be used for multiple types of problems, while others are specific to certain situations. It is important to understand the limitations and assumptions of a formula before using it for a problem.

4. How do I check if my answer is correct?

You can check your answer by plugging it back into the original formula and making sure it satisfies the equation. You can also use estimation or comparison with known values to verify your answer.

5. What should I do if I am unsure about the steps for using a formula?

If you are unsure about the steps for using a formula, it is best to consult a textbook, online resource, or seek help from a teacher or tutor. It is important to have a clear understanding of the formula and its application before attempting to use it for a problem.

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