How to determine the specific heat of a given substance (calorimetry)

  • Thread starter bcass
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Homework Statement


So basically our teacher gave us a bunch of materials and told us to conduct an experiment including the notes on change of heat we took earlier in the week. This is what my group conducted.

We aquired 125 mL of water that started at 21 degrees celsius. We then heated the water an placed it in a styrofoam cup for three minutes where it cooled to a stable temp. of about 70.5 degrees celsius. The unknown metal (presumed zinc) weighed 15.684g. The zinc(?) was placed into the cup for another three minutes and the water was measured again to be 65.1 degrees celsius. The specific heat of zinc is 0.39 (at 25deg.C in J/g deg.C)

This is where I am stuck. I'm not sure how to apply this experiment to the below equation?


Homework Equations



[tex]\Delta[/tex]Q = mC[tex]\Delta[/tex]T

where
[tex]\Delta[/tex]Q = change in heat
m = mass in grams
C = specific heat
[tex]\Delta[/tex]T = change in temp.

The Attempt at a Solution



N/A
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Borek
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At the end temperature of both zinc and water was identical.

Water lost heat - that's why its temperature went down. Qw=mwcwΔTw

Zinc gained heat - that's how its temperature went up. QZn=mZncZnΔTZn

Heat gained equals heat lost.
 

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