How to increase pressure in a pipe ?

In summary, the conversation involves a person seeking help on how to increase the pressure in a pipe using an air compressor. They are trying to understand the relationship between pressure, volume, and power in this process. They mention using an air compressor to increase the pressure and causing the piston to move, but are unsure about the specific calculations and time it would take. They suggest searching for information on pneumatic cylinders, theory of pressure, and design of air compressors for more guidance.
  • #1
Antonius Robertus
3
0
Hi everyone,

I'm sorry if it sounds dumb but I'm struggling here trying to understand how to increase the pressure in a pipe using an air compressor. I wasn't able to find information for this really basic engineering problem, so hope you guys could help me.

Basically, the idea here is to increase the pressure inside a given pipe section closed on both sides, with one side being a piston that is able to move. If we increase the pressure in the pipe section using an air compressor, the piston will tend to move out (which means the volume of the "injection chamber" increases). At the end of the process, let's assume you only know the variation of pressure in the injection chamber and the variation of volume of the chamber (due to the displacement of the piston).

How are all these quantities are linked together ? What is the relation between an air compressor power and the pressure increase in the chamber ? Given a piston displacement (or volume variation) and a rated power for the compressor, how much time would it take to do this operation ?

I hope I've been clear enough but I am really confused about this problem ! Haha
Thanks for your help,

Cheers,
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Search on ' pneumatic cylinders ' , ' theory of ' , 'design of '
 
  • Like
Likes billy_joule

Related to How to increase pressure in a pipe ?

1. How can I increase the pressure in a pipe without changing the flow rate?

To increase the pressure in a pipe without changing the flow rate, you can use a pump or compressor. These devices can increase the pressure by adding energy to the fluid, allowing it to flow at a higher pressure through the pipe.

2. Are there any natural ways to increase the pressure in a pipe?

In some cases, gravity can naturally increase the pressure in a pipe. This is known as hydrostatic pressure and is caused by the weight of the fluid above the point where pressure is being measured. However, this pressure increase is limited and may not be sufficient for all applications.

3. How does the diameter of a pipe affect the pressure inside?

The diameter of a pipe can have a significant impact on the pressure inside. A larger diameter pipe will have a lower pressure, as the same amount of fluid will be spread out over a larger area. Conversely, a smaller diameter pipe will have a higher pressure, as the same amount of fluid will be squeezed into a smaller area.

4. Can changing the temperature of the fluid affect the pressure in a pipe?

Yes, changing the temperature of a fluid can affect the pressure in a pipe. When a fluid is heated, it expands and takes up more space, resulting in an increase in pressure. Similarly, when a fluid is cooled, it contracts and takes up less space, resulting in a decrease in pressure.

5. Is it possible to increase the pressure in a pipe indefinitely?

No, it is not possible to increase the pressure in a pipe indefinitely. The pressure inside a pipe is limited by the strength and integrity of the pipe itself. If the pressure gets too high, the pipe may burst or fail, causing a potential safety hazard. It is important to consider the maximum pressure capacity of a pipe when trying to increase the pressure inside.

Similar threads

  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
458
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
28
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
31
Views
2K
Replies
13
Views
2K
Back
Top