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How to magnetize water using super magnet?

  1. Feb 8, 2012 #1
    If I place a super magnet under the bottom of my water bottle, will it magnetize the water I drink everyday?
    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions

    "After magnetization, the molecules line up in sequence “+-+-“ resulting in reduced surface tension, reduced viscosity, increased dissolvability, increased permeability and increased oxygen content hence making nutrients more readily available to our body, plants and soils. Water is then said to be biologically “alive”."

    how-it-works_5.jpg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 8, 2012 #2
    The water molecules has a permanent electric dipole. It does not have permanent magnetic dipoles so there is nothing to be aligned with the magnetic field.
    The picture shown is may apply to a small particle of a ferromagnetic material like iron but not to water. Water is actually diamagnetic.
     
  4. Feb 8, 2012 #3
    "Regular water molecules cluster without magnetization. Toxins and waste products build up causing molecule clusters to be much larger in size, increasing surface tension, increasing viscosity and limiting dissolvability and permeability of water. This results in poor water productivity as only a small percentage of water and nutrients applied are dissolved and made available for plants to take up at fine root zones. Magnetic treatment breaks up the molecules to smaller clusters allowing them to pass through plant capillaries more readily."

    Does magnetization help to break down the water molecules cluster into smaller clusters?
    If I place a super magnet under the bottom of my water bottle, will it magnetize the water I drink everyday?
    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions
     
  5. Feb 8, 2012 #4
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
  6. Feb 8, 2012 #5
    If I place a super magnet under the bottom of my water bottle, will it magnetize the water I drink everyday? that is my question.
    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions
     
  7. Feb 8, 2012 #6

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    No, water is a diamagnetic material and would weakly create a magnetic field opposite that of the magnet. The other effects you mentioned above are not a result of magnetization of water.
     
  8. Feb 8, 2012 #7
    When water is close to super magnet, will this strong magnet field help to break down the water molecules cluster into smaller clusters?
    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions
     
  9. Feb 8, 2012 #8

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    Since water isn't magnetic I don't see how this could work.
     
  10. Feb 8, 2012 #9
    Depends what you understand by "magnetize".
    Usually it means to induce a permanent, macroscopic, magnetic moment in a sample.
    This magnetic moment is retained even when the induced field is removed.
    Such a thing does not happen with water. In this sense, water is not "magnetized" no matter how super is your magnet.
     
  11. Feb 8, 2012 #10
    Water could be a semi-conductor if enough voltage trys to pass it through, let assume water is always being neutral, but the electron can free to move within water in liquid form, isn't it?

    If I place a super magnet at the bottom of my water bottle, and shake it fast randomly, based on left-hand rule, all electrons will move in one direction, and all proton will move in another direction. With provided magnetic field from super magnet, would this force be generated to break large cluster of molecules into a smaller cluster?

    Does anyone have any suggestions if I do it in this way?
    Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
  12. Feb 8, 2012 #11

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    Absolutely not. The electrons are bound to the molecules. They do not move to other molecules in water.
     
  13. Feb 8, 2012 #12
    The answer is no. Your question is nonsense. I don't know where you got this information but it's wrong. What you're saying is complete pseudoscience. Stay away from whatever website you read that at. Go to the website nasu posted; that will dispel any misconceptions you may have. Here I'll post it again:

    http://www.chem1.com/CQ/clusqk.html
     
  14. Feb 9, 2012 #13
    Electrons can free to move within its molecule, isn' it? not move to other molecules as I understand, so when super magnet is present near the water, all molecules' electrons will move to the same direction as shown on images, isn't it? If I shake the bottle, based on left-hands rule, moving electron will generate force under magnetic field and align each electrons within its molecule structure, it should not be wrong. Will this force break large cluster molecules into a small cluster?

    Does anyone have any suggestions on any misconcept within my statement?
    Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions

    how-it-works_5.jpg
     
  15. Feb 9, 2012 #14
    I don't know why the OP is so fascinated with magnets. Even though the spelling is not similar they are not magic. At any rate any attempt to magnetize water will quickly break down when the magnetic field is removed.

    As you have been already told water is slightly diamagnetic, that means it naturally repels an applied magnetic field. And you can get the protons in water to temporarily align themselves. That is the principal used in proton precession magnetometers. When the induced field is dropped the protons will precess at a rate dependent on the natural magnetic field that is present. This takes a very powerful electromagnet, and it can be done with several molecules, water is one of them. It does not make the water magnetic. No magnet will affect water molecules to any noticeable degree. Once the magnet is taken away the water will almost instantly return to its original state. It will not break up water in anyway.
     
  16. Feb 9, 2012 #15
    It does not break up water molecule H2O itself, but it breaks up the H-bond between H2O molecules and H2O molecule is still in stable stage. Does it make any sense on breaking large cluster of water into small cluster?

    Does anyone have any suggestions on any mis-concept within my statement?
    Thanks everyone very much for any suggestions

    water.gif
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2012
  17. Feb 9, 2012 #16
    You've been told over and over this is non-sense. What exactly is your agenda pushing this?

    You ask to be corrected or to be given advice and then declare anyone who responds as wrong and totally ignore them.
     
  18. Feb 9, 2012 #17
    You cannot break that 'bond' because it's a simple dipole attraction.
     
  19. Feb 9, 2012 #18

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    I honestly have no idea how a high strength magnetic field would affect the dipole bonds between water molecules. I don't think it would do too much, but considering that the water is diamagnetic it does react to the field. The problem is that a magnetic field doesn't push or pull the electrons and protons at all. It simply causes them to spiral around the field lines. However a water molecule is neutral, so it wouldn't really do anything to the molecule as a hole other than to cause it to align its magnetic field anti-parallel to the magnets. Whether this would affect the bonds between molecules I can't say.
     
  20. Feb 9, 2012 #19
    Do you have any evidence regrading the breaking of the hydrogen bonds in presence of a magnetic field? If you have a reference to a research paper, please share.
     
  21. Feb 9, 2012 #20

    davenn

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    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    This is just as bad as his other topic about magnetising concrete

    he wont listen to us guys, or go read the links given to him
    and it just mindlessly drags on and on

    Dave
     
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