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I How to take the time derivative of a potential gradient ?

  1. Dec 2, 2016 #1
    I am not that great at vector calculus , etc.
    Can someone show me how to take the time rate of change of a potential gradient? (Not homework)
    Thx.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 2, 2016 #2

    anorlunda

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    Consider the gravity gradient above a planet. It's time derivative is practically zero. There is no a priori reason for a gradient to have a time rate of change.

    So your question makes no sense without more information.
     
  4. Dec 2, 2016 #3
    Just to clarify...I didn't say a gravitational gradient. How about an electric potential gradient?
     
  5. Dec 2, 2016 #4

    anorlunda

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    OK, why do you think it has a time rate of change?
     
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