HW about physics, electircal engineering. Help please

In summary, you will need to create a one-dimensional shape that balances the electrostatic forces between the charges.
  • #1
qwerty92
2
0

Homework Statement



Hi! My lecturer has given a HW qustion which is as follows:

Can you find a set of charges that are stable? ( total electrical force will be zero)

note: neutral charge is forbidden


Homework Equations


F=k..q1.q2/d^2


The Attempt at a Solution



I drew some shapes for neutral electrical force but cannot prove as mathamatical equation

. Shape can be drawn as a square whose one corner is near to the center with respect to other corners, which becomes not a ordnary square by the way
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
what are the polarities of your 4 charges? Did I get that right - 4 charges?
 
  • #3
qwerty92 said:

Homework Statement



Hi! My lecturer has given a HW qustion which is as follows:

Can you find a set of charges that are stable? ( total electrical force will be zero)

note: neutral charge is forbidden


Homework Equations


F=k..q1.q2/d^2


The Attempt at a Solution



I drew some shapes for neutral electrical force but cannot prove as mathamatical equation

. Shape can be drawn as a square whose one corner is near to the center with respect to other corners, which becomes not a ordnary square by the way

Welcome to the PF.

Is that the full problem statement? Do they mean the electric force on *one* charge when placed in a group of other charges? Or do the forces on *all* of the charges need to be zero?
 
  • #4
The force exerted on each charge will be zero. There is no mentioned about type of charges but you cannot use neutral charge. It is full problem statement. Actually it is conceptual problem. You will decide how many charges you will and their locations.
 
  • #5
qwerty92 said:
The force exerted on each charge will be zero. There is no mentioned about type of charges but you cannot use neutral charge. It is full problem statement. Actually it is conceptual problem. You will decide how many charges you will and their locations.

Fair enough. Use the force equation and maybe induction to prove whichever viewpoint you think is correct...
 
  • #6
Actually, I initially thought that it would not be possible, but I think there may be at least one configuration that could work. I need to sketch it up to see if it could work.

I'd suggest starting with a 1-dimensional geometry to see if you can find a way to balance electrostatic forces...
 

Related to HW about physics, electircal engineering. Help please

1. What is the difference between physics and electrical engineering?

Physics is a broad branch of science that deals with the study of matter, energy, and their interactions. It focuses on understanding the fundamental laws and principles that govern the physical world. Electrical engineering, on the other hand, is a specialized field of engineering that deals with the study, design, and application of electrical systems, such as circuits, power generation, and electrical devices. While both disciplines are closely related and often overlap, physics is more theoretical and focuses on the fundamental principles, while electrical engineering is more applied and focuses on the practical application of those principles.

2. What are some common areas of study in physics and electrical engineering?

Some common areas of study in physics include mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. In electrical engineering, common areas of study include circuit analysis, analog and digital electronics, power systems, and control systems.

3. How does physics relate to electrical engineering?

Physics provides the theoretical foundation for understanding the behavior of electrical systems. Many principles and laws in physics, such as Ohm's law and Coulomb's law, are essential in the design and analysis of electrical circuits. In addition, many concepts in electromagnetism, such as electric and magnetic fields, are used in the design of electrical devices and systems.

4. How can I apply my knowledge of physics to electrical engineering?

There are many ways to apply your knowledge of physics to electrical engineering. For example, you can use your understanding of mechanics to design efficient motors and generators, or your knowledge of electromagnetism to design antennas and communication systems. Additionally, your understanding of thermodynamics can be helpful in designing energy-efficient systems, and your knowledge of optics can be applied in the design of optical communication systems.

5. What are some career options for someone with a background in physics and electrical engineering?

There are many career options for individuals with a background in physics and electrical engineering. Some common career paths include working as an electrical engineer, a research scientist, a technical consultant, or a university professor. With the increasing demand for renewable energy and advanced technology, there are also many opportunities in areas such as renewable energy, telecommunications, and robotics.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
6K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
8K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
2K
Back
Top