Hydrogen bonding. Why isn't Cl included?

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

I was wondering why hydrogen bonding only occurs in molecules containing H and one or more of the following: N, O, and F.

Why isn't Cl included in this list? The reason I ask is because the electronegativity of Cl is very close to (and even equal to one of) the electronegativities of the other atoms (N, O, and F), which would lead me to think it would have nearly the same effect on a hydrogen atom as the other three.

Thanks for any insight,
-Zachary Lindsey
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
2
0
I think is important the size of the atom.

Cl is bigger than the elements from second periode F, O, N

see this wiki link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_radii_of_the_elements_%28data_page%29" [Broken]

The H-bonding is very directional not only because the diferences between the electronegativity, is neccesary a no-metal small.

Sorry for my English, I hope you understand my words
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3
I understand you just fine. Thank you for the link. It seems like a nice resource.

Thanks again for the reply.
 

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