Hydrostatic pressure, and force

  • Thread starter Dell
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  • #1
Dell
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if i am asked to find the hydrostatic pressure on a certain object emerged in a liquid, am i meant to use the barometric or manometric pressure?

when asked for hydrostatic force, should i find the force on the object , or the force that the solution applies to the object??
 

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  • #2
PhanthomJay
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Hydrostatic pressure is the at rest pressure (due to gravity) from the fluid alone and does not include the additional pressure at the surface (such as from the atmosphere). I would define the hydrostatic pressure as the gauge pressure, and total pressure (or absolute pressure) would be the sum of the hydrostatic (gauge) pressure plus the pressure at the surface, if any. Often say in a problem with an underwater submersible, you might want to calculate the force on a window from the water.....If the submersible is maintained at atmospheric pressure within, then the total pressure on the window is just the hydrostatic pressure, as the atmospheric pressure term cancels out.
 

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