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News I want to sue my phone company for releasing my personal info

  1. May 11, 2006 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Assuming it can be proven, of course.
    http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1193478,00.html

    Since Quest did not turn over the phone records of their users, as did AT&T, Verizon, and BellSouth, obviously cooperation was voluntary. That being the case, they are liable for their actions. I would like to see a national class action suit against all three companies.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2006
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  3. May 11, 2006 #2

    Evo

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    Where does it say Qwest was asked to comply? I see no mention of them. :confused:
     
  4. May 11, 2006 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    Oh, good point. It was implied in one report that they refused, but I don't recall hearing that for certain.

    There is still the issue of whether this was voluntary in either case. Were they ordered by a court to turn the information over?
     
  5. May 11, 2006 #4

    Evo

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    AT&T, Verizon & Bell South would be heavy carriers of "international calls". Makes sense they would have been the only three companies asked to comply. The request, as I recall was to monitor international calls to certain countries. If you haven't been calling one of those countries, you can relax.
     
  6. May 11, 2006 #5

    Pengwuino

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    Too bad even the Bush-hating Democrats in Congress said theres no legal right to having your phone # kept from the NSA.

    Think first, then begin the rhetoric.

    I bet these newspapers are making a killing off the public's over-reactive ways

    *edit* oops bad mistake up there
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2006
  7. May 11, 2006 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    Evo,
    No, they turned over a list of domestic call activity for the last three years on "tens of millions of users", as is being reported.
     
  8. May 11, 2006 #7

    Evo

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    Also, it wasn't listening in, they had an algorythm to check for key words.
     
  9. May 11, 2006 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    The tracked phone numbers called and recieved.
     
  10. May 11, 2006 #9

    Evo

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    Who says so? I worked for AT&T random calls were not recorded, do you have any idea how many billions of calls that is?

    Are you just talking about archived numbers? That's not actual phone calls.

    edit: So, if you weren't calling any terrorists, I guess your safe. Anything you do over a public network is public, when will people realize that?
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2006
  11. May 11, 2006 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    Stay on topic. This is about the phone company. Think first, then spout the nonsense.
     
  12. May 11, 2006 #11

    Pengwuino

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    Who do you think is giving them the number activity? Go find any part of your contract that says they couldn't do that. You'll be surprised.
     
  13. May 11, 2006 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    They know what numbers you called, and incoming, and how long you talked. That is private information.
     
  14. May 11, 2006 #13

    Pengwuino

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    Not according to the contract you sign/the US legal system.
     
  15. May 11, 2006 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    It doesn't matter what the contract says. That's what courts are for. And we are talking about tens of millions of US citizens.
     
  16. May 11, 2006 #15

    Pengwuino

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    Have you found any legal experts that have said saying what # you called is illegal? Theres already many saying its not...

    And what do you mean it doesnt matter what the contract says. That's like not paying your mortgage payments and then sueing because a bank takes your house away.
     
  17. May 11, 2006 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    What are you talking about?
     
  18. May 11, 2006 #17

    Pengwuino

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    It's not illegal, no one, not even the radicalist of Congressmen are saying its illegal, give it up. Feingold was even briefed on it and gave the ok to it.
     
  19. May 11, 2006 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    Anyone can sue anyone for anything. This certainly requires a legal challenge.
     
  20. May 11, 2006 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    You are again off-topic. I am talking about a civil suit. Why don't you stay out of it until you catch up.
     
  21. May 11, 2006 #20

    Pengwuino

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    Well of course, you can sue. It will all only depend on what your contract says.
     
  22. May 11, 2006 #21

    Pengwuino

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    You already said it doesnt matter what the contract says so you were off topic first, sorry. Unless you think contracts aren't legal basis for civil cases.
     
  23. May 11, 2006 #22

    Evo

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    Actually, no. People think so, but not legally so.

    Why do you think it is so easy for law enforcement to get those records?
     
  24. May 11, 2006 #23
    What is illegeal with the NSA keeping your phone number:confused:

    Yes I think the New york times is trying to make money off this kind of stuff they were the ones that illegealy discalffied sercret govemnet information and they try to make it look that there the "hero's" how protecting our "freedom" if you want proof look at the title for the thread about the secert wire tapping.
     
  25. May 11, 2006 #24

    SOS2008

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    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12734870/page/3/

    Qwest and Google are the only companies protecting privacy rights that I know of to date. So much for the 200 million customers sold out by AT&T Inc., Verizon Communications Inc. and BellSouth Corp.
     
  26. May 11, 2006 #25

    Curious3141

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    Ivan, I'm confused about what you want to do. Let's break it down :

    1) Was a criminal act committed?

    A : I'm not well up on the law, but according to Pengwuino/Evo and your own concession, no law was broken. So no criminal suit can be filed. Fine, you accept that, let's move on.

    2) Was the phone company in breach of contract?

    A : I don't know, that depends on the contract you signed. If, as the Penguin stated, you signed a document that authorised the phone company disclosing your records to the government, then what case do you have? The whole thing hinges on that paper with the fine print, let us know if there's a clause that explicitly allows them to release the info about called/received numbers and call durations. If there's no such clause *and* there's no "catch-all clause" that allows them to do whatever they wish, then, maybe, you have a case for breach-of-contract. Usually, companies protect themselves with a vague and all-encompassing catch-all clause, so I wouldn't be too confident.

    3) Was there any harm done to you or to your interests as a direct result of a breach of contract, if one is proven to exist?

    This is the basis of negligence law. If and only if you can prove that you were harmed in some substantive way by the release of such info (in such a way that some contract you knowingly signed was contravened), then you have a case for a negligence suit. "Harm" or "damages" implies more than just a feeling of privacy violation - legitimate examples of these would be bodily harm or financial loss.

    I am not a lawyer, but this is my layman's take on it. I would be grateful if a real lawyer could correct my ramblings. But the way I see it, you don't really have anything approaching a case.

    If you just want to make a stink and get the regulations changed, I suggest you go with that ultimate ungoverned judge, jury and executioner - *the free press*. Get a sympathetic reporter to blow the story up into big news, and then, maybe, change will be effected. But then, this is already happening, and the way the current political tide is, I don't see much changing.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2006
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