IF I want to research breeder reactors, do I go for NucEng or Nuclear Physics?

In summary, if you are interested in researching breeder reactors, it is recommended to start by reading specific literature and studying nuclear engineering. While nuclear physicists may have some knowledge in this field, studying nuclear engineering will provide a more comprehensive understanding of breeder reactors. Although there have been some challenges and obstacles in implementing breeder reactors, the nuclear physics behind them is well understood and there are plenty of resources available online to aid in research. Courses in reactor physics, materials science, mechanics of materials, fluid mechanics/dynamics, and corrosion are also beneficial for those interested in conducting research on breeder reactors.
  • #1
zheng89120
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  • #2
zheng89120 said:
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If you want to research you should start reading the specific literature.
 
  • #3
zheng89120 said:
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Hope you don't mean me. I know the theory but have no direct experience with breeders. And from my understanding the ones that have been built have not been all that successful. There do seem to be a lot of resources online so start there.
 
  • #4
NUCENG said:
Hope you don't mean me. I know the theory but have no direct experience with breeders. And from my understanding the ones that have been built have not been all that successful. There do seem to be a lot of resources online so start there.
If so, here.
Unlike me many people here can answer on your questions regarding fission reactors.
I think that some of them are experts in this field.
 
  • #5
I would recommend you study nuclear engineering.

Most nuclear physicists study the nucleus and other subatomic particles like quarks Some nuclear physicists are more applied science and work on nuclear reactors, but you won't find many.

There has been a lot of experience with breeder reactors. I am sure there are several things that need more understanding. Yet, they are a lot of engineering problems to increase the performance of breeders.
 
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  • #6
The nuclear physics of breeder reactors is well understood.

The engineering aspects are more challenging. Study nuclear engineering if one wishes to do research concerning breeder reactors. Look at courses in reactor physics (neutron transport theory), materials science, mechanics of materials, fluid mechanics/dynamics, corrosion, . . .
 

Related to IF I want to research breeder reactors, do I go for NucEng or Nuclear Physics?

1. What is the main difference between Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Physics?

Nuclear Engineering is an engineering discipline that focuses on the practical applications and design of nuclear systems, while Nuclear Physics is a branch of physics that studies the fundamental properties and behavior of atomic and subatomic particles.

2. Which field would be more beneficial for researching breeder reactors?

If you want to research breeder reactors, it would be best to go for Nuclear Engineering. This field is more closely related to the design, construction, and operation of nuclear reactors, including breeder reactors.

3. Can someone with a background in Nuclear Physics still research breeder reactors?

Yes, it is possible for someone with a background in Nuclear Physics to research breeder reactors. However, they may need to acquire additional knowledge and skills in Nuclear Engineering to fully understand the engineering aspects of breeder reactors.

4. Are there any similarities between Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Physics?

Yes, there are some similarities between the two fields. Both Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Physics deal with the behavior and properties of nuclear materials and may use similar mathematical and computational methods in their research.

5. Can I switch from Nuclear Physics to Nuclear Engineering if I am interested in researching breeder reactors?

Yes, it is possible to switch from Nuclear Physics to Nuclear Engineering if you are interested in researching breeder reactors. However, you may need to take additional courses or obtain a higher degree in Nuclear Engineering to gain the necessary knowledge and skills for this specific area of research.

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