Image in a glass sphere (Ray Optics)

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of a hollow sphere and the thickness of its walls. A classmate asks about the location of "it said", referring to information about the topic. Another classmate agrees that the thickness of the sphere affects the image formed and asks for clarification on how it differs from a solid sphere. The conversation ends with a mention of using a link to calculate the focal point of a solid sphere and how a larger hollow centre affects this.
  • #1
anyonebutangel
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crystal-ball_2.jpg
 
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  • #2
Where is 'it said'? If the sphere is hollow then how thick are the walls?
Think of a bubble.
 
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  • #3
sophiecentaur said:
Where is 'it said'?
said by a classmate.
 
  • #4
sophiecentaur said:
Where is 'it said'? If the sphere is hollow then how thick are the walls?
Think of a bubble.
I agree that image formed depends on the thickness of sphere.I just want to know how is it different from that formed in solid sphere.
 
  • #5
anyonebutangel said:
said by a classmate.
I did wonder about that. Classmates are not always a good source of good info. :rolleyes:
Starting with a solid sphere, you can use this link to work out the point where a distant object (the Sun, for instance) will be focussed at an approximate focal point. The distance will depend on the material used (refractive index). As the hollow centre gets bigger, the focus will be further away until there is no focussing effect for a very thin shell.
 

Related to Image in a glass sphere (Ray Optics)

1. What is the phenomenon behind the image formed in a glass sphere?

The phenomenon behind the image formed in a glass sphere is called refraction. When light enters the glass sphere, it changes speed and bends, causing the image to appear distorted or magnified.

2. Why does the image appear inverted when viewed through a glass sphere?

The image appears inverted because of the way light bends when it enters the glass sphere. The light rays cross over each other, causing the image to appear upside down.

3. How does the size of the image change when viewed through a glass sphere?

The size of the image changes based on the curvature of the glass sphere. If the glass sphere has a smaller curvature, the image will appear larger, and vice versa.

4. Can we use a glass sphere to create a magnifying glass?

Yes, a glass sphere can be used as a magnifying glass. The curved surface of the glass sphere causes light to converge, creating a magnified image.

5. How is the focal length of a glass sphere determined?

The focal length of a glass sphere is determined by its curvature. The more curved the surface, the shorter the focal length will be. It can also be calculated using the formula f = R/2, where f is the focal length and R is the radius of the curvature.

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