Infinite brightness in the singularity?

In summary, according to the website provided, the black hole appears brighter and brighter as an observer approaches the horizon, tending to infinite brightness at the horizon. However, this only applies to a static observer and is not a property of the black hole itself. An observer free-falling or accelerating through the black hole would not see the same infinite brightness. Additionally, the infinite brightness is caused by the observer's acceleration rather than the black hole. To witness the future history of the universe, one would need to remain outside the horizon or stay just above it while constantly accelerating.
  • #1
DavidGahan
9
0
Since the black hole has infinite brightness near the singularity just below the photon sphere, would the big bang singularity also possesses such characteristic?
 
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  • #2
DavidGahan said:
Since the black hole has infinite brightness near the singularity just below the photon sphere
What do you mean infinite brightness?
 
  • #3
Passionflower said:
What do you mean infinite brightness?

According to this site: http://jila.colorado.edu/~ajsh/insidebh/schw.html

"The Universe appears brighter and brighter as you approach the horizon, tending to infinite brightness at the horizon."
 
  • #4
Note that this applies only for the static observer - i.e. the original quote is:

Click on the image at left (with the horizon grid) or right (without the horizon grid) for an animation of the appearance of the outside Universe as you lower yourself slowly to the horizon. The Universe appears brighter and brighter as you approach the horizon, tending to infinite brightness at the horizon. But again, no one with any sense would do this.

An observer free-falling through the black hole, or even an observer accelerating away from the black hole with a finite acceleration while falling through the event horizon, would not see the same infinite brightness. So it's a bit of a mistake to think of the infinite brightness as a property of the black hole.

Also note that an observer with infinite acceleration in a flat space-time would see the universe in a similar way. More precisely, an observer accelerating in a flat space-time (say with a rocketship) would also see the universe appear visually to abberate, approaching in the limit of infinite acceleration a single point of infinite brightness in front of the rocket ship.

So it's better to think of the infinite brightness as being due to the observer's acceleration than it is to think of it as being due to the black hole.

See for instance http://casa.colorado.edu/~ajsh/singularity.html

(another website from colorado.edu)

Answer to the quiz question 5: False. You do NOT see all the future history of the world played out. Once inside the horizon, you are doomed to hit the singularity in a finite time, and you witness only a finite (in practice rather short) time pass in the outside Universe.

In order to watch the history of the Universe unfold, you would have to remain outside the horizon, the Schwarzschild surface. One way to watch all the history of the Universe would be to stay just above the horizon, firing your rockets like crazy just to stay put. The Universe would then appear not only speeded up, but also highly blueshifted (probably roasting you in gamma rays), and concentrated in a tiny piece of the sky just above you.
 

What is the singularity?

The singularity is a hypothetical point in space where the laws of physics break down and become infinite. It is believed to exist at the center of a black hole.

What is infinite brightness?

Infinite brightness refers to the idea that at the singularity, the concentration of energy and matter is so intense that it creates an infinitely bright and infinitely dense point.

How does infinite brightness in the singularity relate to black holes?

The concept of infinite brightness in the singularity is directly tied to black holes. The singularity is thought to be at the center of a black hole, where gravity is so strong that it causes a collapse of matter and creates the singularity's infinite brightness.

What would happen if we could observe infinite brightness in the singularity?

Since the singularity is located within a black hole, it is not possible for us to directly observe its infinite brightness. However, if we were to somehow observe it, it would likely result in a catastrophic release of energy that could potentially destroy anything in its path.

Is infinite brightness in the singularity a proven concept?

No, the concept of infinite brightness in the singularity is still a theoretical idea. While it is based on scientific theories, it has not been proven through direct observation or experimentation.

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