Infinite number of energy levels available to an atom

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of ionization in atoms with an infinite number of energy levels. It is explained that while there may be infinite energy levels, there is a maximum energy that an electron can have. Ionization occurs when an electron reaches this maximum energy and leaves the atom. However, the electron does not escape to infinity, but rather goes to another location with lower energy, creating a counter ion.
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I'm confused about something. If there are an infinite number of energy levels available to an atom, how and why would an ionization need to take place? The electron always has another energy level to occupy once its energy has been raised.
 
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  • #2


No, there is a limit above which electron leaves the atom. You can put infinite number of points in any line segment, but it doesn't mean every point on the line belongs to the line segment.
 
  • #3


1 Firstly note that that an infinite number of energy levels does not mean an infinite energy, there is a maximum energy the electrons in an atom can have and you have maybe seen a picture of a spectrum where the lines get closer and closer going up to this maximum; it is quite analogous to escape energy in classical.

2 Secondly anyway they don't escape to infinity of eempty space like a rocket escaping Earth gravity - they go somewhere else where they can have less energy creating a 'counter ion', assisted also in aqueous solution by water molecules orienting their charges oppositely to stabilize the ion.
 

1. What does it mean for an atom to have an infinite number of energy levels?

When we say that an atom has an infinite number of energy levels, it means that there are an infinite number of distinct energy states that an electron within the atom can occupy. These energy levels are represented by the different orbitals or shells in an atom's electron cloud.

2. How does the concept of an infinite number of energy levels relate to the stability of an atom?

The infinite number of energy levels available to an atom is essential for its stability. Each energy level can only hold a certain number of electrons, and when these energy levels are full, the atom is considered to be stable. If there were a finite number of energy levels, the atom would eventually run out of space to add more electrons, making it unstable.

3. Can an atom have more or fewer energy levels than another atom?

Yes, different atoms can have different numbers of energy levels. The number of energy levels an atom has is determined by its atomic structure, specifically the number of electrons it has. For example, hydrogen, with only one electron, has one energy level, while oxygen, with eight electrons, has eight energy levels.

4. How are the energy levels within an atom organized?

The energy levels within an atom are organized into shells, with the innermost shell having the lowest energy and the outermost shell having the highest energy. These shells are further divided into subshells, which correspond to the different types of orbitals within the atom.

5. How do electrons move between energy levels in an atom?

Electrons can move between energy levels in an atom through the absorption or emission of energy. When an electron absorbs energy, it moves to a higher energy level, and when it releases energy, it moves to a lower energy level. This process is known as electron transition and is responsible for the emission of light in atoms.

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