1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Integrate the following equation f=exp(m*x) dx where x =[x1 , x2]

  1. Sep 23, 2010 #1
    Dear

    I am trying to integrate the following equation

    f=exp(m*x) dx

    where x =[x1 , x2] is a vector of variable could you help me please to find the solution when I would like to integrate like this kind of equations.

    help appreciated

    Best Regards
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 23, 2010 #2

    CompuChip

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Re: integration

    So you want to find
    [tex]\int e^{m \vec x} \, \mathrm d\vec x[/tex]
    right?

    Can you first explain what that notation means?
    Usually [itex]\mathrm d\vec x = dx_1 \, \mathrm dx_2[/itex] but what is [itex]e^{m \vec x}[/itex] in this case?

    (If everything is properly defined, you'd expect something like [itex]m e^{m \vec x}[/itex] of course)
     
  4. Sep 24, 2010 #3
    Re: integration

    the x=[x1 x2] is array of variables where x1 and x2 are complex and m is
    a constant. so my question how could I integrate the function over an array dx and should I have one or two complex integral ,I think so two may be because we have two variable in the array

    thanks for the help
     
  5. Sep 24, 2010 #4

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Re: integration

    Yes, we understood that. CompuChip's question was "what does [itex]e^{m[x1, x2]}[/itex] mean?" How are you defining e to a vector power? In order for the integral to make sense, e to a vector power, here, must be a vector. Can you give more context for the problem.

    (And you would expect something like [itex]e^{m\vec{x}}[/itex] divided by m, not multiplied by m.)
     
  6. Sep 24, 2010 #5
    Re: integration

    well i guess the question should be moved to the right forum
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook