Internet Security: Protecting Yourself from Phishers

In summary, the teacher in a computers for business class discussed the issue of phishing, where phishers use fake websites to steal personal information such as credit card details. However, the question arises of how these phishers obtain the credit card information necessary to create these websites. It is possible that they use stolen credit cards from other victims. Phishers are not just after credit card information, but any personal information that can be used for identity theft. There are free website hosting services that do not require a credit card, but phishers could simply provide false information to create an account. The only possible trace to the person behind the phishing could be their IP address, but even that can be hidden through proxies. The comparison is made
  • #1
GiTS
135
0
So I'm taking a computers for business class and the teacher did a lecture on how everyone on the interent is trying to steal from me. One thing he talked about was phishing. What I don't get, and he couldn't really answer, is that phisherman(phishers?) use websites to mimic legit sites to get you to give them your info to steal your credit card info. But you need a credit card to buy a website. So are these guys using their own credit card and just preying no one does a WHOIS lookup? It seems kind of like a catch 22 otherwise. They'd need my credit card to make a site to steal my credit card.
 
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  • #2
more than likely they're using a credit card stolen from someone else. it's not always credit card info they're after either. Phishers in general are after any info that will let them hijack your identity: names, birth dates, SSNs, passwords, etc.
 
  • #3
There are free hosts for websites that don't require you to have ad's on the website, and they would just ask for information which you could just lie about in order to make an account with them.

So the only link to the person behind this would be an ip address that may be logged with the website host, which may be behind many proxies...
 
  • #4
You need a license to buy a gun, so how can someone use it in a robbery and then toss it away without getting caught.

You get the idea.

k
 
  • #5
You don't need a credit card to have a website. You need an internet connection, that's all. It's pretty easy to steal those these days.

- Warren
 

Related to Internet Security: Protecting Yourself from Phishers

What is phishing and how does it work?

Phishing is a type of cyber attack where scammers use fraudulent emails, text messages, or websites to trick individuals into giving out sensitive information such as passwords, credit card numbers, or social security numbers. These scammers often pose as a legitimate source, such as a bank or government agency, and use fear or urgency to manipulate victims into providing personal information.

How can I protect myself from phishing attacks?

One of the best ways to protect yourself from phishing attacks is to be cautious of any unsolicited emails or messages requesting personal information. Be wary of links or attachments in these messages, as they may lead to fake websites or contain malware. It is also important to keep your devices and software up to date and use strong, unique passwords for all of your accounts.

What are some red flags that may indicate a phishing attempt?

Some common red flags of a phishing attempt include urgent or threatening language, requests for personal information, misspelled words or poor grammar, and URLs that do not match the legitimate website. Additionally, be cautious of any emails or messages that offer a prize or reward for providing personal information.

What should I do if I think I have been a victim of a phishing attack?

If you believe you have fallen victim to a phishing attack, it is important to act quickly. Change your passwords for any accounts that may have been compromised and monitor your bank and credit card statements for any suspicious activity. You should also report the attack to the appropriate authorities, such as your bank or the Federal Trade Commission.

Is there any additional security measures I can take to protect myself from phishing attacks?

In addition to being cautious of unsolicited messages and keeping your devices and software up to date, you can also use security software and tools such as firewalls, anti-virus programs, and anti-phishing extensions for your web browser. These can help detect and block phishing attempts before they reach your inbox.

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