I Is a photon simply a vibration of the spacetime lattice?

  • Thread starter Curiousphy
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I guess these would be unresolved mysteries per current knowledge? Not being a scientist myself, I am just in my little curiosity quest to make sense of the world... I agree some of these questions are speculative and we may never know... like, if spacetime gives matter dimensions and light/photons exist dimensionless and outside of time, if you took away spacetime, could matter or photons still exist as a dimensionless and timeless "singularity" or "nullarity"... if so, maybe the big bang expansion of the universe wasn't so unfathomable... if all the mass/energy/information was already there just dimensionless and timeless.
 
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Vanadium 50

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It feels like these questions are just pure speculation.
It's worse. It's a bunch of scientifically sounding words strung together, but there is no meaning there. These might be grammatical sentences, but they are meaningless. "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously". If there were meaning there, they could be expressed mathematically.

Many of our hopeful and homegrown theoretical physicists think that the mission of a theoretical physicist is to come up with the right combination of words to explain nature. But physics is a quantitative science.
 
So, in the spirit of forum compliance, does physicsforums have a "speculations" section for people like me to interact with scientists/physicists to ask these questions? Not everyone would be able to capture "meaning" mathematically, and it may not be my questions, but sometimes speculative questions may spark new perspectives for scientists?
 
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So, in the spirit of forum compliance, does physicsforums have a "speculations" section for people like me to interact with scientists/physicists to ask these questions? Not everyone would be able to capture "meaning" mathematically, and it may not be my questions, but sometimes speculative questions may spark new perspectives for scientists?
Absolutely not. "Been there, done that, will never do it again" is the rule on speculation here at PF.

PF is for the discussion of ESTABLISHED science.
 

FactChecker

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So, in the spirit of forum compliance, does physicsforums have a "speculations" section for people like me to interact with scientists/physicists to ask these questions? Not everyone would be able to capture "meaning" mathematically, and it may not be my questions, but sometimes speculative questions may spark new perspectives for scientists?
I think that your initial question deserved a response and got one. The next step is for you to study those answers and the basic relevant physics. On such a complicated subject, that may take significant time and effort, but it is a very interesting subject. You will undoubtedly have more specific and scientific questions as you study. Those type of questions are welcome. But without further study, there are many more speculative theories than anyone can possibly answer. IMHO, this is not the place to try.
 
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I think that your initial question deserved a response and got one. The next step is for you to study those answers and the basic relevant physics. On such a complicated subject, that may take significant time and effort, but it is a very interesting subject. You will undoubtedly have more specific and scientific questions as you study. Those type of questions are welcome. But without further study, there are many more speculative theories than anyone can possibly answer. IMHO, this is not the place to try.
what he said (very small).jpg
 
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@Curiousphy to expand slightly on my previous answer, and along with what factchecker said, PF has tried speculative sections before, but here's the problem. Before you can meaningfully "think outside the box" you have to know what's IN the box. Speculative posts pretty much never go anywhere useful, and as I said, PF has tried it and found that it definitely does not work. So much so in fact that I can imagine the mentor's response on seeing you asking for it once again (which happens about once a month).

not that again.jpg
 

Ibix

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Science is like a jigsaw puzzle. Only we don't have all the pieces and we don't have the picture on the box. We have experimentalists out there hunting down the back of the sofa for pieces and putting the pieces we have together in different ways. And we have theoreticians suggesting ways that bits might fit together and trying to work out what the picture might be.

Newton suggested the picture was a mountain. Maxwell suggested it was two mountains. Einstein realised the mountains were identical, and suggested it was one mountain, reflected in a lake.

The problem with "speculation" by non-experts is that they've only read vague descriptions of the jigsaw and have no idea what we know fits together, nor ways it cannot fit together. So your "spacetime lattice vibrations" is a bit like barging in and saying "maybe it's a cat!" While I'm perfectly happy to point out that it would be a very strange cat with trees and a snowline and discuss the evidence for it being a mountain and a reflection, addressing in detail why it's not a cat is not an efficient way for you to learn. And a mountain is so clearly not a cat, I'm not likely to learn anything.

Frankly, making speculations based on (at best) vague pop-sci descriptions is a waste of your time. A mountain is not a cat. And answering you becomes a waste of mine if you keep doing it. Nor is a mountain a dog, nor a mouse, nor a chicken, nor a... A billion blind guesses is not helpful - it's just noise.

If you want to contribute you need to put in the time to learn the maths and the evidence so that you actually know what is known. What is plausible and what is not. It is hard work, but it's absolutely fascinating and strange.

If you don't or can't do the studying, that's perfectly fine. But you have to accept that ideas you come up with without study are like wondering if the mountain might be a cat.
 
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I guess these would be unresolved mysteries per current knowledge?
I wouldn't say that either. As far as I know there is no meaning to the phrase "displace spacetime". There isn't a standard scientific meaning for the term, and you don't appear to have a specific meaning in mind either, in terms of either experimentally measurable quantities or things that could be calculated from other quantities. So it isn't an unresolved mystery, it hasn't even been defined well enough to merit the status as a mystery let alone an unresolved one.

You may as well ask if the farglesnap is a flubnubitz. It is not an unresolved mystery, it is an undefined question. One of the most important things that we do as scientists is to define our questions so carefully that they can be answered by performing an experiment. When a question is posed with that level of clarity and the answer is unknown, then that becomes an "unresolved mystery".

I am just in my little curiosity quest to make sense of the world
I applaud that. Over the course of the last few centuries we have made enormous strides towards exactly that goal. I would strongly recommend seeking to learn that. Even Newton famously "stood on the shoulders of giants" to learn and understand how the world works. Physics Forums can help you in that goal.

In the meantime, I am going to go ahead and close this thread as the original question has been answered to your satisfaction, and I don't want to engender bad feelings in the community with this tangent.
 

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